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Stocks Procter & Gamble Co

  • The infamous "Flash Crash" of last Thursday where the Dow lost as much as 998.50 points in a matter of minutes may have 'really' been much worse.

  • Gary Gensler, the head of the CFTC, is also testifying in the House of Representatives on the cause of last Thursday's plunge. Mary Schapiro, the head of the SEC, has also released her testimony. ...There are two main points that most seem to agree upon.

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    The autopsy continues on what caused a 1000 point drop in the Dow last Thursday. But with a quick look at the chart, it is obvious to the naked eye that electronic trading was at least partially to blame for the tailspin.

  • Plus, get calls on agriculture, oil and more.

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    I guess what I'm trying to say is that when you look at growth prospects and solid financial performers; tech ought to be the new destination when investors are looking to fly to some quality locale.

  • Stock Trader

    Computer glitch or not, last week's crash has many thinking about the state of the markets and the overall health of the global economy. But maybe there's a more important question to ask. What if the crash had been to the upside?

  • NYSE Trader

    Investigators seeking an explanation for the brief stock market panic last week said Sunday that they were focusing increasingly on how a controlled slowdown in trading on the New York Stock Exchange, meant to bring about stability, instead set off uncontrolled selling on electronic exchanges. The NYT explains.

  • Procter & Gamble's HQ in Cincinnati, Ohio

    Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway continued to sell shares of Procter & Gamble during the first three months of the year. It's likely the sales are part of Buffett's efforts to raise money for his big acquisition of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad.

  • Except for high-yielding dividend stocks, that is. Here’s the Mad Money Game Plan going forward.

  • The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    Stocks sold off in volatile trading Friday as an encouraging jobs report fell to the back burner and the market remained jittery after Thursday's nauseating freefall.

  • With a perfect storm of chaos hitting the markets this week—protests in Greece, a possible Greek debt default and a near-1,000 point selloff in the Dow Jones Industrial Average—how can jittery investors find the confidence to enter the market?

  • The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    Stocks sold off in volatile trading Friday as an encouraging jobs report fell to the back burner and the market remained jittery after Thursday's nauseating freefall.

  • The European Debt Crisis - See Complete Coverage

    Trading was volatile Friday as an encouraging jobs report fell to the back burner and the market remained jittery after Thursday's nauseating freefall.

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    Reporters learn early on that they're not supposed to ask, "How did it feel?" The answer is usually, "How do you THINK it felt?" I'm asking anyhow.

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    The NYSE and Nasdaq engaged in a high-stakes blame game on CNBC this morning. 

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    As the market dropped our team was watching. A car wreck is a much too pleasant analogy. I was at my desk in 1987, 1989, 9/11, 2008, and I’ve never witnessed what I witnessed yesterday.

  • Why do stocks have a slight bid to them in the U.S.? Traders are saying that the busted trades are creating a bid on the Street. Fat fingered trade? Computer glitch? It's possible that one of these was the cause of yesterday's drop, but as traders stream into Wall Street, the worry is that this could have happened without a computer glitch or fat fingered trade.

  • This is is the probably the toughest week of the year for active traders. Why? We've seen a huge increase in volatility and volume but it’s been around events so big (Greece, Spain, future of the euro) that traders have no idea — or strong opinion — on how it will play out.

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    One regulator said officials had identified “a huge, anomalous, unexplained surge in selling” as the source of the market rout, the New York Times reports.

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    The Dow plunged nearly 1,000 points before paring those losses, apparently triggered by  a trader error.  Sources told CNBC a trader entered a "b" for billion instead of an "m" for million in a trade possibly involving Procter & Gamble.