×

Stocks Target Corp

  • As oil hit nine-month highs Thursday, “Fast Money” pro Tim Seymour took a longer view on the effects that would have in the consumer space.

  • Targets Hits its Bulls-Eye

    The second largest U.S. discount retailer beat on both the top and bottom lines, while projecting full-year earnings that far exceeded the Street's estimates, with Colin McGranahan, analyst at Bernstein.

  • bank_vault_200.jpg

    "We are in the worst economic crisis since 1929," Credit Agricole CEO Jean-Paul Chifflet. If you think the Greece mess is costless or bloodless, just look at the European bank news this morning. At least four banks posted poor earnings and cited losses on their Greek holdings.

  • Yuval Steinitz, Israeli Finance Minister

    By and large Israel’s business and finance movers and shakers are confident Israel will weather whatever storm comes at them and persevere on the business front.

  • TJX Higher Profits on Holiday Sales

    Retailer TJX reports higher quarterly profit on strong holiday sales. Insight with Kimberly Greenberger, Morgan Stanley retail analyst.

  • Home Construction

    2011 was the worst year on record for the nation's builders, in sales and starts, but demand is slowly returning, and the concern is that when demand really surges in the coming years, there will be too little supply to meet it.

  • Marc White, left, asks Best Buy employee Steve Buckner questions about an Apple MacBook Pro laptop computer at a Best Buy store in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.

    Apple and Sam’s Club, Wal-Mart Stores’ warehouse clubstore, are reported to be in talks to put Apple stores within 47 of Sam’s U.S. locations, according to a report in 9to5Mac, a website for Apple enthusiasts.

  • Stocks ended narrowly mixed in a lackluster session Thursday following a handful of mixed earnings reports, decline in weekly jobless claims and ahead of the government's monthly employment report due Friday morning.

  • Designer Jason Wu attends the Jason Wu For Target launch at Skylight SOHO.

    Sunday is a big day in America. Sure, it's Super Bowl Sunday — but for non-sports lovers, the Jason Wu collection launches in Target stores and online.

  • While the superstore retailer lagged during the holiday season, Target has kicked off 2012 with “aggressive promotions” and is expected to ramp up even more in February, says Adrianne Shapira, Goldman Sachs’ senior retail analyst.

  • Clothing purchase

    Retailers reported mixed sales results in January, offering a signal that American consumers remain cautious amid a weak economic recovery.

  • market-insider-stocks-to-watch-200.jpg

    Take a look at some of Thursday morning's early movers:

  • shopper_market1.jpg

    Consumers are showing an increasing preference for store brands over brand names, and it’s not all about the price.

  • The Stilt Cigarette Jeans by AG Adriano Goldschmied

    Electric blue jeans. Hot pink shoes. Lime green skivvies. Wear it like it’s 1985. These are the colors the fashion industry wants you to add into your wardrobe this spring.

  • The “Mad Money” host has a good feeling about the retailer.

  • Three mutual funds are poised to have a breakout year and move to the top of the standings after dismal performances in 2011, according to S&P Capital IQ research.

  • Since Ron Johnson joined JCPenney, the stock has received a free pass. JCP shares are actually up 11 percent despite continuing disappointments. But after all, if anyone can revive a tired retailer, the man who created the Apple retail experience should be the one.

  • Shoppers check out at a newly-opened Target store near Royersford, Pa., on Monday, Nov. 13, 2006. Discount retailer Target Corp. said Tuesday its third-quarter profit rose 16 percent, beating analyst expectations as its sales rose 11 percent. (AP Photo/George Widman)

    The retailer hopes by pausing talks to sell its credit card receivables portfolio, and repaying the financing that it will be able to get a deal and sell the portfolio in either late 2012 or early 2013.

  • Amazon.com

    Giant e-commerce companies like Amazon are acting increasingly like their big-box brethren as they extinguish small competitors with discounted prices and free shipping. The little sites are fighting back with some tactics of their own, like preventing price comparisons or offering freebies that an anonymous large site can’t.

  • traders_NYSE_happy4_200.jpg

    After wild price swings that left investors bewildered and not a cent richer last year, stocks are rising again, and calm has settled over the market like blue skies after a storm. Or maybe eye of the storm is the better metaphor.