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Stocks Toyota Motor Corp

  • car_dealership_ford.jpg

    Ask Ford President of the Americas Mark Fields if he expects strong sales in the month of May, and you get an interesting response. Yes, he expects double-digit industry growth and Ford should have a relatively strong month, but his interest has already shifted to June.

  • Ford

    It's not every day one of the Big 3 decides to take work it contracted to a foreign supplier and bring it in house back in Detroit.

  • As Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne unveiled the new Jeep Grand Cherokee he flashed a smile that said just how far the troubled automaker has come in the last year.

  • Tesla Model S

    At first glance, it looks like a win/win situation. The partnership of Tesla and Toyota should, on paper, help both companies.

  • Toyota

    Once again, Toyota executives are on Capitol Hill getting grilled about unintended acceleration. Once again, the hearing will end without an understanding of what's behind complaints of Toyota's racing suddenly speeding up. Once again, I can hear supporters and critics saying these hearings are a joke. Both are right.

  • What impact will Germany’s naked short-selling ban have on the U.S. markets? Lee Eugene Munson, chief investment officer at Portfolio Asset Management, shared his insights.

  • With the Euro Zone crumbling under pressure of a debt crisis, Michael Novogratz, president of Fortress Investment Group, told CNBC his hedge fund is de-risking its position and moving toward the US to play the anti-growth trade.

  • 2010 Toyota Prius

    They want to move forward. But making sure they don't repeat past mistakes keeps reminding them (and the public) of where they've been. It's the yin and yang of where Toyota executives find themselves this spring and summer.

  • General Motors Headquarters

    With a first quarter profit of nearly $900 million dollars ($1.66 per share), GM not only showed it is back in the black, but more importantly, laid another brick in the foundation needed for an IPO.

  • car_dealership_ford.jpg

    Ford CEO Alan Mulally said Thursday that the automaker should be "solidly" profitable in 2010 as it recovers from a sharp downturn in the auto industry.

  • This year, Ford shareholders will have a little giddy up in their step. And for good reason. In the last year, the Mulally makeover has kicked in gear and revved up Ford's once idling profit engine and stock price.

  • Car Keys and Money

    The real appeal of GM owning the old GMAC would be in making the company more attractive for an IPO.

  • The Dow ended lower Tuesday as investors locked in some profits on stocks and sent gold to a new closing high as geopolitical worries left the market a little jittery.

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    What follows is a roundup of corporate earnings reports for Tuesday,  May 11.

  • Stocks opened lower on Tuesday as yesterday's global rally lost momentum. How should investors be positioned? Ed Keon, portfolio manager and managing director at Quantitative Management Associates, Prudential Financial and Jason Trennert, chief investment strategist and managing partner at Strategas Research Partners shared their insights.

  • Stocks advanced in mid-afternoon trading Tuesday, led by consumer and techs, after major exchanges agreed to put curbs on big drops in individual stocks.

  • Stocks retreated as the global rally from the previous session lost momentum and euphoria over Europe's near $1 trillion debt rescue package faded. Gold prices soared.

  • Toyota headquarters

    Let's see if this makes sense. In the fiscal year that ended in March of 2009, Toyota lost $4.4 billion. A year later, after what was arguably the worst crisis in the company's history, Toyota swung to a profit of just over $2.2 billion. How did that happen?

  • U.S. stock index futures pointed to a lower open Tuesday as the global rally from the previous session lost momentum and euphoria over Europe's near $1 trillion debt rescue package faded.

  • Ray LaHood, the transportation secretary.

    Four months after calling Toyota "safety deaf," Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood says the Japanese automaker is getting the message. "I think their attitude has changed," said Secretary LaHood after spending more than hour meeting with Toyota leaders including CEO Akio Toyoda. "I came away with the idea Mr. Toyoda has listened to us," said LaHood.