×

News Corporation

  • Lachlan Murdoch named co-chair of News Corp

    Lachlan Murdoch, the son of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, has been named as the non-executive co-chairman of News Corp.

  • News Corp reports Q2 earnings

    News Corp. is reporting Q2 EPS of $0.31 ex-items on revenue of $2.24 billion, with CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • News Corp reports Q1 earnings

    News Corp is reporting Q1 EPS of $.03 ex-items vs. $.05 estimated, on revenue of $2.07 billion, with CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • Brooks trial begins over phone hacking scandal

    The trial of former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks and others linked to alleged phone hacking begins on Monday at the Old Bailey in London.

  • London's 'trial of the century' kicks off Monday

    CNBC's Catherine Boyle discusses what impact the phone hacking trial of former News Corp executives Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson may have on the U.K.

  • Should Murdoch lose a title?

    Simon Greer, CEO of The Nathan Cummings Foundation and Ian Whittaker, media analyst at Liberum Capital, discuss the 21st Century Fox's vote to split Rupert Murdoch's current position as both chairman and CEO.

  • A first for 21st Century

    It is the first investment day for the newly named "21st Century Fox," reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin, with the latest details from the meeting.

  • Don Arnold | WireImage | Getty Images

    Wendi Deng has hired the well-known New York attorney William Zabel to represent her in her divorce from Rupert Murdoch, CNBC has learned.

  • Gabelli's Trade on Media Stocks

    The FMHR crew reveals their top trades on Barnes & Noble, Tesla and Dell. And Gabelli Funds CEO Mario Gabelli, explains why he owns News Corp., Viacom, and shares his views on Netflix. Also Herb Greenberg has the update on Intuitive Surgical's nearly 20-percent slide today.

  • The News Corp Spin-Off

    Rupert Murdoch's publishing and education company "Amplify" will remain a unit of News Corp, while its cable and movie assets unit will become "Twenty First Century Fox." CNBC's Julia Boorstin has the details.

  • Favour News Corp's U.S. Earnings: Expert

    Philip Parker, CIO of Altair Asset says he sold out of News Corp prior to the split, but would look at investing back in the company's 21st Century Fox business for U.S. dollar earnings exposure.

  • Rupert Murdoch to Divorce Wendi Deng

    Media mogul Rupert Murdoch is getting divorced from his wife Wendi Deng Murdoch. Sarah Ellison, Vanity Fair, and CNBC's Robert Frank discuss.

  • News Corp's Hacking Scandal

    The British phone hacking drama is taking a new turn at the same time rumors are swirling around London regarding a sex scandal, reports CNBC's Kayla Tausche.

  • Fast & Furious 6

    The action-packed sixth installment of the "Fast & Furious" film franchise became the biggest opening film in Universal Pictures' history during Memorial Day weekend.

  • Titans Defend Dimon

    A growing number of Wall Street titans have been voicing support for JPMorgan's chairman & CEO Jamie Dimon, reports CNBC's Bertha Coombs. Stephen Lerner, labor & community activist, and Duff McDonald, "Last Man Standing" author.

  • Cable Boosts News Corp Profits: Pro

    Tuna Amobi, senior media and entertainment equity analyst at S&P Capital IQ, says News Corp results, driven by Cable, were better than expected and discusses the upcoming spin-off.

  • Latest TV Face-Off

    Aereo has found a way to stream live TV directly to users without paying the broadcast networks, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin. Meanwhile, News Corp COO Chase Carey says he believes Aereo is pirating his business' broadcast signal.

  • News Corp Says Aereo Is Pirating Its Signal

    News Corp COO Chase Carey issued a statement saying they believe Aereo is pirating their broadcast signal, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • Faber Report: News Corp. Update

    CNBC's David Faber reports News Corp.'s publishing business will have $2.6 billion in cash after the company splits its business.

  • Time Warner's decision to spin off Time Inc. will allow the media conglomerate to focus entirely on its cable television and film businesses. The New York Times reports.