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Which Do You Want To Save: You Bank Account Or Paycheck?

If you had to choose between your savings or your paycheck, which would you pick? It depends on which is bigger, I suppose. But in some ways, it's like choosing which child to sacrifice in "Sophie's Choice."

As I read the analysis of the government's moves to save the financial system, some believe we are sacrificing our paychecks (i.e., the taxes we pay) to save our bank accounts.

It will take hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars to pull this all off. On the other hand, this could potentially be a win-win. If the government--that is, the taxpayer--takes over these bad mortgages written down to almost nothing, then eventually sells them (or the homes) at a profit, we make money! We've already made money on AIG today!

I know it's more complex than that, but I'm going to ask the question anyhow in the poll.

YOUR EMAILS
On my blog about how SIPC insures your brokerage account, Richard P. (who says he retired on the profits he made in the '87 crash) writes:
"You left out a VERY important detail. The SEC guarantees the money to the "Owner of Record", which, unless the investor is very savvy, is almost always the brokerage firm, not the client."

Steve G. writes about the excess insurance (CAPCOexcess) that some brokers buy as extra coverage:
"Important to also note that some firms may not use CAPCOexcess, but may have different excess insurance through re-insurers--Lloyds of London is one such excess SIPC re-insurer that several firms use."

FORGET LEGITIMATE BUSINESS, THE ILLEGITIMATE ECONOMY IS THRIVING
Sign of the high times. Up in Humboldt County, California, the marijuana harvest is in full swing. Trimmers are needed. And here is a new "high" in the entrepreneurial spirit. A young man in dreadlocks was advertising his services on the side of the road holding a sign on which he's drawn a pair of scissors. As one person told me, "In 27 years living in the 'Emerald Triangle', this is a first."

Questions? Comments? Funny Stories? Email funnybusiness@cnbc.com