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Super Bowl Ads Go 3-D

What do football, aliens, computer chips, PepsiCo, and the Peacock all have in common?

A 3-D Super Bowl ad.

When the Super Bowl airs on NBC this Sunday a lot of people will be paying more attention to the commercials than the game itself, and this year those ads will be entering a whole new dimension. DreamWorks Animation, PepsiCo's SoBe, Intel , and NBC are teaming up to bring their messages off your TV screen and into your living room.

Get ready for two and a half minutes of 3-D advertising, right before the half-time show —perfect timing to snag a huge audience.

Intel is giving away over 130 million free 3-D glasses (emblazoned with its Intel logo, of course), available at 28,000 Pepsi/SoBe displays around the country. Each of the glasses has a mini Intel microprocessor inside so Intel's investing in distributing these glasses to showcase the power of its technology.

CORRECTION/Update: The 3-D process is made possible by technology invented by Intel and running on Intel processors, so Intel's investing in distributing these glasses to showcase the power of its technology.

DreamWorks Animation is spearheading the 3-D broadcast, the studio buying a 90-second long spot to promote its first digital 3-D movie, "Monsters vs. Aliens," which is due out in March.

A minute-and-a-half Super Bowl spot, must be incredibly expensive — 30 second spots go for $3 million this year, I doubt you get much of a discount for buying in bulk. But this is certainly the biggest possible stage to introduce the 3-D format that DreamWorks CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg is putting his money on.

Starting with this spring's film, the studio will distribute exclusively in the 3-D format.

The movie trailer will be paired with a minute-long ad for Pepsi's SoBe Life Water beverage. That ad, featuring SoBe's signature lizards and dancing Football players will really pop into your living room. The commercial's director, Peter Arnell, raved to me about how much more you can pack into a commercial when you get to work in various dimensions. It'll certainly catch the viewer’s eye.

And NBC, which is broadcasting the Super Bowl, is also getting in on the 3-D action. It's asking viewers not to "chuck," their 3-D glasses, but instead to hold onto them for a special 3-D broadcast of TV sitcom "Chuck" on NBC the Monday after the Super Bowl.

Sports Biz with Darren Rovell -- On the Ground Coverage of the Super Bowl
Sports Biz with Darren Rovell -- On the Ground Coverage of the Super Bowl

(*Note, NBC like CNBC is owned by parent company, General Electric*)

This huge investment in 3D on your TV screen shows that the technology is at a tipping point.

It's still a young technology, and I’m not saying that next year you'll be watching the Super Bowl in 3-D, but increasingly we'll see advertisers and broadcasters take advantage of its ability to jump out of the screen.

Questions? Comments? MediaMoney@cnbc.com