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"Call of Shame" — Your Emails

I reported, you voted, and the overwhelming winner of last week's "Call of Shame" is the SEC.

You also emailed.

Some didn't like my choice of nominees, while others said I left out worthy candidates.

From Chris B.:"If you think the SEC should be the Hall of Shame winner, why not consider the Bush administration who appointed Cox as head of SEC, with orders to make the agency vacuous?"

Call of Shame
CNBC.com
Call of Shame

Lawrence S. defends Vijay Singh's decision to keep sporting Stanford Financial logos, which I suggested was something Tiger wouldn't do: "Vijay has a contract which he has been paid for, therefore it isn't up to him. Who cares what Tiger would do, he is nothing but a pompous clown."

From Irene M.: "...with all the Madoffs and Stanfords and rapacious bank CEO's and crooked hedge fund managers to choose from, you list two athletes among your possible choices. ATHLETES!!!! Athletes who committed terrible crimes against humanity... like taking steroids or wearing a truly shameful person's advert on their heads. Oooh ooh...shame on them. Better yet...shame on you."

From Ed L.:"I would like to nominate (former Countrywide CEO) Mr. Angelo Mozilo for your 'scum bags of the earth series'. He is right next to Madoff and Stanford in my book..."

From Bob F., a potential nominee for this week's Call of Shame: "Instead of listing the SEC as a choice, it should be Joe Biden's name associated with the Stanford Financial sham. In the Nixon administration his VP was the first to go..."

And "An Angry Chef" says I missed the boat on the real winners (losers): "(It) should be every 'loser-idiot' who signed a mortgage loan document that lied and/or never read the document...These losers who can't pay for their mortgages should be dragged in the street, and they should live on the street as bums! But then Obama will come out with some stupid social program..."

Send me your suggestions for this week's lowlights and lowlifes in business and finance to Funny Business: funnybusiness@cnbc.com