You Wouldn't Stiff The Paper Boy, Would You?

You pay to have the paper delivered, but would you pay to have it delivered online? One major company is betting you will!

So, if you’re a fan of the New York Post, the Times of London or even Fox News you’d better get your wallet out. It’s entirely possible that you’ll have to pay to read your favorite stories.

The owner of those sites, News Corp, wants every one of their readers to pony up.

During the Q4 earnings call News Corp chief Rupert Murdoch said an industry that gives away its content is cannibalizing its ability to do good reporting so “we intend to charge for our news websites.”

Murdoch explained that, "The Wall Street Journal's WSJ.com is the world’s most successful paid news site and we will be using our profitable experience there and the resulting unique skills throughout News Corp to increase our revenues from all our content.”

Although he did not provide details on the conference call Murdoch did indicate that he wants to make people pay for access to his news websites by the middle of the 2010 fiscal year, which ends next June.

Will the media industry follow News Corp’s lead? And for that matter, will consumers pay for news content? For insights we turned to Miller Tabak analyst David Joyce.

Joyce tells us if consumers don’t get used to paying for useful content there won’t be any more useful content. People got used to paying for paper delivery now they need to get used to Internet delivery.

Guy Adami doesn’t see it that way. The Negotiator says, I don’t see how it can work. Once the genie is out of the bottle it’s out. I don’t know how you can go from giving people content for free to asking them to pay.

What do you think? Tell us now!

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Trader disclosure: On Aug 6th, 2009, the following stocks and commodities mentioned or intended to be mentioned on CNBC’s Fast Money were owned by the Fast Money traders; Adami Owns (AGU), (C), (GS), (INTC), (MSFT), (NUE), (BTU); Najarian Owns (AA) Call Spread: Najarian Owns (BUCY) And Is Short (BUCY) Calls; Najarian Owns (CSCO) And Is Short (CSCO) Calls; Najarian Owns (HIG) Calls; Najarian Owns (INTC) And Is Short (INTC) Calls; Najarian Owns (JPM) And Is Short (JPM) Calls; Najarian Owns (MS) And Is Short (MS) Calls; Najarian Owns (MSFT) And Is Short (MSFT) Calls; Najarian Owns (YHOO) Call Spread; Terranova Owns (MSFT), (RIMM), (MCD), (AMZN); Terranova Is Short (F), (WYNN); Seygem Asset Management Is Short (PBR); Seymour Owns (AAPL), (AA), (BAC), (C), (TM)

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