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NSFW: PETA or PORN?

PETA used to stand for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. These days you might think it's Promoting Endless T&A. The organization has long used naked celebrities to promote dumping fur, leather, even wool.

But you ain't seen nothing yet.

Actually, you're about to see everything.

The group has released it's latest State of the Union Undress, where model Marissa Lewis takes it all off, leaving nothing to the imagination. (WARNING: This is NOT safe for work it's at least R-RATED).

Lewis does a long, lingering striptease full of double entendres ("as a new leaders tries to arouse in us", "our unique honor to turn Americans on", "for those of you who are taking matters into your own hands-even at this very moment").

As she strips, the video cuts away to scenes from last year's real State of the Union, showing old white guys, aka Congressmen and Senators, applauding with approval. John McCain gives her a thumbs up. But there's also a cutaway of First Lady Michelle Obama, and the video ends with a quote from Martin Luther King, Jr., "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere". Is the peep show itself an injustice to the cause PETA's fighting for?

"PETA is Basically a Porn Site Now"says the headline at Gothamist.com. Blogger Gary Francione calls it "sexist".

We all know it's a wacky upside down world these days, where "human bed warmers" are being employed in London, and a porn version of MTV's "Jersey Shore" is being produced.

We all know that sex sells.

But this?

I'm sure most of the people watching the PETA video are men, and I bet a lot of those men eat meat, some from an animal they killed themselves. PETA has a chance to capture their hearts and minds, but I don't think that's what's catching as Lewis takes her clothes off. I challenge you to remember a single thing she says. After the strip show ends, the video continues with a haunting montage of animal cruelty, but I wonder how many viewers bail out by then.

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