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Market Tips: How to Play Low Rates for the Long Term

Global stocks traded in the green on St Patrick's Day Wednesday, in response to a relatively optimistic outlook from the Federal Reserve combined with a pledge to keep interest rates low for an extended time.

Experts told CNBC the U.S. central bank may only begin to raise rates late next year. They give their tips on how to invest in a low interest-rate environment.

No US Rate Rise Until Q3 2011

David Mann, head of research, Americas at Standard Chartered believes the Fed will not hike rates this year in the absence of strong momentum to drive growth in the U.S. economy. He sees the central bank only beginning to hike rates in the third quarter of next year.

Rate Expectations

The Fed will keep rates low to boost business investment and consumer spending, due to the mid-term elections and concerns of a double dip, says Chris Pederson, CEO of York Securities and Dealing.

US Economy Stabilizing

The Fed appears more positive on the U.S. economy, notes Magnus Prim, chief strategist, Asia, SEB. He tells CNBC this suggests the economy is starting to stabilize.

Foreign Markets: Focus on the Facts

Over time, analysts should pay less attention to the FMOC statements and more attention to hard and fast data, says Adrian Foster, head of financial markets research, Asia Pacific, Rabobank. He discusses the dollar and other foreign currencies.

Wall Street Not Bothered by US-China Tensions

Wall Street is giving half an ear, no more, to rising U.S.-China tensions, Yu-Dee Chang, principal & chief advisor at ACE Investment Strategists told CNBC. He says there are bigger issues plaguing the markets.

Will Oil Break Above $84?

The bias is for commodities to break out to the topside but that will be checked by where inflation is headed in China and India, says Jonathan Barratt, managing director at Commodity Broking Services.

Hot on Aussie Banks, Not on Chinese Developers

Greg Bundy, vice chairman at AIMS Finance picks BHP Billiton for exposure to China as the country remains the engine for Asia Pacific's growth. He expects Australian financials to outperform but he is negative Chinese developers.