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British Firm Aims to Rescue Gulf of Mexico

With US/UK relations under strain because of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a group of Brits intends to try and give a helping hand.

Ultra Green, a British-based environmental research and development company, is launching an initiative which it hopes will clean up the oil slick and fund itself by selling the oil it captures.

The company believes it can combine innovative technology with grass roots action to clean up the gulf and provide work for fisherman in the region.

“The plan will provide work for local fishermen and harnessing the enthusiasm and knowledge of the frustrated local community, whose offers of help to BP have so far been largely ignored,” Ultra Green executive chairman told CNBC.

BP shares hit a 14-year low in London Friday after closing lower in New York Thursday.

Ultra Green has pooled its resources with its USA science partner Algaeventure Systems, which has an established relationship with the US military and the US Department of Energy, to provide a rapid and scalable method of clearing up and the oil spill and deploying barriers to protect beaches.

With help from the Commercial Fishermen of America and USA volunteer groups, Brighton-based Ultra Green intends to mobilize 168 fishing boats, towing technology platforms specifically designed to remove the oil and transfer it to specially chartered tankers.

The company has hired Major David McPherson, the man who successfully moved Margaret Thatcher’s Falklands war machine 8,000 miles in 5 weeks, to head up this complex logistics exercise.

“Even though BP is a multi-national business, it is perceived by many to be a British company," Antony Blakey, executive chairman of Ultra Green International, said.

"So it seems appropriate that British people and companies should show that we’re doing all we can to help the people of the coast save their economy and ecology rather than just salvage the mess,” Blakey added.

The first full-scale platform will be ready and in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico in early July, he said.