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Sen. Portman: Obama Weak on 'Unfair' China Trade

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman speaks during the third day of the Republican National Convention.
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U.S. Sen. Rob Portman speaks during the third day of the Republican National Convention.

Sen. Rob Portman told the GOP Convention on Wednesday night that President Barack Obama hasn't done anything about China's unfair trade practices because he needs China to keep buying the bonds that finance the growing U.S. deficit.

Speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Portman said the United States is as beholden to China for purchasing bonds as it is to the Middle East for oil. The Ohio Republican said that will end if Mitt Romney is elected president.

China holds nearly $1.2 trillion in U.S. debt.

Portman was on Romney's short-list of vice presidential candidates. He served as U.S. trade representative and White House budget director in President George W. Bush's administration.

Romney has accused China of manipulating its currency and blocking access to its markets.

Total Cost: $58,065Tuition: $43,840Room & Board: $13,980Fees: $245Claremont McKenna, located near downtown Los Angeles, accepted only 12.4 percent of its applicants for the class of 2016, a rate that admissions counselor Brandon Gonzalez said ensures that students here will be going to school only with other top students.�The class of 2016 will be one of the most talented groups of students we have ever seen,�  The school will charge these students a tuition of $21,920 per semester, or $43,840 for the entire academic year, incurring a total cost of
Total Cost: $58,065Tuition: $43,840Room & Board: $13,980Fees: $245Claremont McKenna, located near downtown Los Angeles, accepted only 12.4 percent of its applicants for the class of 2016, a rate that admissions counselor Brandon Gonzalez said ensures that students here will be going to school only with other top students.�The class of 2016 will be one of the most talented groups of students we have ever seen,� The school will charge these students a tuition of $21,920 per semester, or $43,840 for the entire academic year, incurring a total cost of