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  • china investors.jpg

    Even as the US market continues to rally, many institutional investors are trimming their US holdings and putting more money in foreign stocks—especially those in emerging markets.

  • bartz_140.jpg

    Yahoo is done with its cost-cutting program and now hiring, Chief Executive Carol Bartz told CNBC Tuesday.

  • wind_turbines1_200.jpg

    Despite recent advances, the U.S. lags far behind other major countries when it comes to clean energy investment and experts say it may never compete on equal terms, let alone lead.

  • Shanghai

    As more nervousness creeps into the US stock market, investors are sharpening their look at overseas opportunities where growth is outpacing the US recovery.

  • REVA NXG

    Depending on whom you ask, India's Reva Electric Car Company  is either the next big thing in automobiles, or a maker of glorified golf carts.

  • Most expect Korea to bump rates up and to start its exit program to get in front of any potential inflation. There has also been chatter about resource based Norway raising rates as well.

  • People buying Gold Jewellery at Tribhovandas Bhimji Zaveri in New Delhi, India

    Indians own more gold than the citizens of any other country. They use the glittering metal as ornaments to flaunt family wealth, as a source of retirement savings and as insurance against calamities.  But lately, gold has become something else: collateral, and the basis of one of the country’s fastest-growing businesses, gold loans.

  • Asian economic growth is becoming increasingly driven by international consumers and this will eventually make the Asian market much more profitable than the West, according to Puru Saxena from Puru Saxena Wealth Management.

  • Gold Bricks

    The International Monetary Fund's executive board on Friday was discussing selling some of the fund's gold to provide low-interest loans to poor countries and shore up its internal finances.

  • igindex_fourscreens_300.jpg

    The economic recovery may be sharper than many forecasters, including the International Monetary Fund, have predicted, precisely because the recession was so deep, Michael Mussa, senior fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, told CNBC.com.

  • bubble_burst.jpg

    Economists, recognizing that bubbles tend to come in bunches, are on the lookout for the next market to fizzle. They say that governments, central banks and international bodies should scrutinize a few markets that look likely to froth over in the next few years.

  • dragon_EM.jpg

    Emerging markets were the shining light when the world entered recession last year, but even these developing economies have been struck by the global slowdown. But as China and India continue to grow and Japan exits out of a contraction, are emerging markets becoming the world's saving grace, and if so, how should investors be taking advantage of the opportunities there?

  • Taj Mahal, Agra, India

    India could become an investment magnet among emerging markets if economic reforms are put into effect and if the new coalition government finds way to fix the country's crumbling infrastructure, experts interviewed by CNBC said.

  • Thailand is the next big place for investing in emerging markets, especially the country’s banking stocks, Templeton Asset Management Managing Director Mark Mobius told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Avery Painting

    If you’d added a few paintings to your portfolio over the last few years, instead of all those Lehman Brothers, AIG and Citigroup shares, your retirement nest egg might be looking a little different right now. That said, the art market can be volatile, and a beautiful painting can lead to an ugly loss.

  • Stack of sugar cane sticks

    While all commodities move in cycles, sugar in India is a case study in feast-to-famine swings in which bountiful crops are followed by anemic harvests every two or three years.

  • Global Markets

    Despite a stunning surge of nearly 50 percent that otherwise might indicate a looming pullback, investors remain mostly bullish on emerging markets.

  • Flag of India

    Retailers are flocking to India, thanks to an economy that is still growing and a young population eager to gobble up new brand names.  But some Western brands — once they conquer the regulatory hurdles to getting into the market here — may get a sinking sense of familiarity.

  • Last Friday, the closely-watched University of Michigan consumer confidence survey registered a disappointing reading of 64.6, when hopes had been for a 70 or so. But maybe it shouldn't have been a surprise, figuring that, during the month, energy prices were high (since reversed, of course), the stock market was struggling, and unemployment continued to rise.

  • An IMF forecast suggests by next year the economies of at least two BRIC nations could be on fire. Should you strike while the iron's hot or will you just get burned?