×

Economic Measures Inflation

  • Chinese Yuan and US Dollar

    China has finally bowed to international pressure, and this move is seen as an attempt by China to placate the West and ease international criticism of its rigid currency policy ahead of the G20 leaders meet in Toronto this coming weekend; a face-saving way of giving in to pressure from the US, EU and international financial institutions to allow its currency to appreciate.

  • Gold

    The yellow metal has repeatedly been rallying to higher highs on strong volume, attracting the attention of traders, investors and yes, even economists.

  • hip_140.jpg

    Advancements  in health care over the last two decades has been nothing short of awe-inspiring, but the endless parade of technological upgrades has also produced a nasty side effect—a stratospheric rise in healthcare costs,

  • deflation_paper.jpg

    Deflation is the economy's version of a vicious cycle. As prices fall, so do wages and profits. Demand, consumption and production also fall. Jobs are cut. Consumers put off purchases . The negative forces feed off of each other.

  • The recovery will continue to be steady, but “sluggish and choppy” with a 1 ½ percent growth rate, and unemployment will remain high, at between 9 and 10 percent, for the next 18 months, Jan Hatzius, chief US economist of Goldman Sachs, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • BOE_buses_200.jpg

    Inflation has been rising fast in the UK, with a big budget deficit and the Bank of England's quantitative easing policy being blamed by some analysts for it.

  • From IPOs and earnings reports to economic data and options expiration, here’s your must-have guide for the next five trading sessions.

  • Gold closed below $1,225 an ounce on Thursday as stocks rose and the euro climbed against the dollar. How should investors be trading the precious metal? Rich Ilczyszyn, senior market strategist at Lind-Waldock, and Torsten Slok, senior economist at Deutsche Bank, offered their insights.

  • It is the season for economic forecasts, and I have been polled by several published surveys. Here is my response.

  • The trade deficit, along with the credit and housing bubbles, were the principal causes of the Great Recession. Now, a rising trade deficit and continued weakness among regional banks, still burdened by bad loans, threatens to stifle the emerging recovery and keep unemployment near 10 percent through 2011.

  • cash_in_icecube_200x147.jpg

    The United States will have to adopt austerity measures similar to the ones taken in Europe, because the problems faced are largely the same, Timothy Scala, macro-strategist at Sophis Investments, told CNBC.com.

  • deflation_paper.jpg

    A consensus is forming that policymakers should tighten fiscal policy, sharply, in countries with large fiscal deficits. But what if they find that it tips economies into recession, or even deflation? The FT reports.

  • bank_columns_200.jpg

    Democratic capitalism is not flawed. Rather, government policymakers are destroying a system that took mankind from dark feudal superstitions to cracking the secrets of life with deceptions, delusions and abuse.

  • President Barack Obama

    Either Barak Obama fixes what’s broken in the economy, or he will be remembered for spending his entire first term blaming George Bush.

  • Job Losses

    If the economy keeps growing at 3 percent the balance of 2010, demand for new capacity—improved rental housing, better located new homes, and commercial construction for retail and factory improvements—should accelerate in 2011.

  • Unemployment

    Unemployment is expected to only fall to 9.8 percent from 9.9 in April, because many sidelined adults, sensing improved conditions, started looking for work. The big challenge is to keep GDP growing at least 3 percent to pull down unemployment.

  • Friday markets ended with a precipitous selloff that made for the worst May since 1962 and worst month in general since November 2008. Are US markets headed for recovery, or is a double-dip in the works? CNBC heard from expert economists, strategists and investors. See what they had to say...and decide for yourself.

  • Postal Worker

    It’s “good news” that personal incomes are on the rise. But when you crunch the numbers about the source of that income, the US may have a problem—or does it?

  • BURNING_MONEY.jpg

    The pressure on governments to fund bailouts and spend to reinvigorate their economies has led to a sharp increase in the issuance of sovereign debt.

  • Euro coins

    Once upon a time, the European Economic Community-remember that quaint post-World War II institution-thrived without a single currency. A larger European Union can again, but it needs to jettison the fantasy that the benefits of capitalism can be accomplished without adequate incentives to work hard and invest.