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Economic Measures Inflation

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Below are the minutes released by the Federal Open Market Committee after its Apr. 28-29 meeting:

  • False bottom

    The stock market may hit new lows this year or the next as the current rally has been largely caused by the money printed by central banks and fundamental problems remain unsolved, legendary investor Jim Rogers told CNBC Wednesday.

  • yen_euro_dollar.jpg

    The next financial meltdown will be in the currency markets, as central banks around the world have been printing money, giving the appearance of massive government intervention to weaken their currencies, legendary investor Jim Rogers, chairman, Rogers Holdings, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Federal Reserve

    The U.S. recession is likely to drag on for several more months before a modest recovery takes hold and slowly gains legs next year, a top Federal Reserve policy-maker said Tuesday.

  • waiter_1.jpg

    School's out, surf's up, summer beckons. Time for college students to see if they can stay afloat in the worst economy their generation has known.

  • The singe European currency may bring the end of the whole European Union, because its one-size-fits-all approach means countries on the "wrong" side of the economic cycle lose out, European MP Nigel Farage said.

  • Vince Farrell

    The Euro zone's GDP came out and made for dismal reading. It should be remembered this is yesterday's news, and there are "green shoots" in Europe as well that we will comment on in a moment. But the headline numbers were truly bad, and Germany's number was shocking.

  • Stocks flopped Friday, capping a dismal week, as bank stocks pulled back after recent gains.

  • Exterior shot of the New York Stock Exchange.

    If it's true that the group that led the last bull market doesn't lead the next one, investors will have to forget about banks and consider a new array of choices.

  • Stocks opened flat Friday as investors were encouraged by a pair of better-than-expected manufacturing readings but dismal economic data out of Europe and weak U.S. retail reports capped gains.

  • Futures pared losses Friday after a pair of better-than-expected manufacturing readings.

  • The Consumer Price Index was relatively flat last month, while the core CPI rate, excluding energy and food, rose 0.25%.  The consumer price index fell 0.13% in April from a year earlier, as a decline in food and energy prices brought consumer prices down.

  • Fall of the Berlin Wall

    A sustainable recovery will occur only when the corporate system will be cleaned of losses and capitalism risks collapsing if this does not happen, Marc Faber, the author of "The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report," told CNBC Friday.

  • Prepare for War, the Death of capitalism and Bankruptcy of the US Government (not necessarily in that order). A vintage performance from the author of "The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report".

  • Renowned bear Marc Faber, author of "The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report," told CNBC that capitalism risks failing like communism unless the free market is allowed to clean up troubled companies.

  • Marc Faber

    Major central banks' efforts to lift the world economy by printing money have boosted asset prices, so stocks are unlikely to hit their lows from November and March, Marc Faber, the author of "The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report," wrote in his latest research report.

  • I've been asked frequently how to play the inflation trade using ETFs. Let me show you how to do it, with the warning that you are likely early in this trade. The simplest way to play the inflation trade is to buy gold-and that's easy with ETFs.

  • Although global stocks were down again on Thursday, experts tell CNBC it is time to buy U.S. stocks, just not companies relying on the government.

  • Global stocks were higher Wednesday despite data out of China showing the country's industrial output rose less than expected in April. But experts tell CNBC there is real growth potential in the Asian economy.

  • job_fair_line.jpg

    With nearly 14 million Americans unemployed, a growing number of people are competing for a dwindling number of job openings, allowing some employers to drive down pay and benefits for new hires.