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Economic Measures Inflation

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    U.S. President George W. Bush, Chinese President Hu Jintao, Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso and other members of the 21-nation Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation group, or APEC, said they would refrain from raising trade barriers over the next 12 months.

  • Barack Obama

    U.S. President-elect Barack Obama said Saturday he was crafting an aggressive two-year stimulus plan to revive the economy, warning that swift action was needed to prevent a deep slump.

  • Chaos reigns Friday: Lame-duck White House and Congress are unable to reach a decision on the financial crisis. Yet Citigroup stock inched up, despite misgivings over the CEO's determination not to break up the firm. And while legislators dither over the jet-setting Big 3 automakers' fates, one strategist told CNBC that Ford Motor stock could yet quadruple overnight. (You read that correctly.)

  • As the Dow opened to the upside on Friday, Jack Welch, former General Electric chairman & CEO, shared his insights on Detroit, the economy and Wal-Mart's new CEO.

  • The Big 3 U.S. automakers may have reached a bailout compromise Thursday — or not. Citigroup shares hover near $5, even after mega-investor Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal said he'd boost his Citi stake to 5 percent. Strategists told CNBC to expect more volatility — and no bottom for months yet.

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    First the good news. It looks like inflation is under control. Now the bad news…

  • Stocks plunged to a more than five-year low amid worries about the fate of the auto industry — and the economy — as a bailout for the sector grows increasingly unlikely.

  • Cuts to interest rates may not be enough in and of themselves to boost the economy, Pimco's Bill Gross said on Wednesday.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Below are the minutes released by the Federal Open Market Committee after its Oct. 28-29 meeting:

  • Stocks declined Tuesday amid worries about the fate of the auto industry as a bailout grows increasingly unlikely.

  • Things look worse for GM, Ford and Chrysler Wednesday as Congress seems less likely to approve a $25 billion automaker bailout. Stocks slipped — but some analysts say that slide had little to do with the Big 3. CNBC canvassed the experts, who foresee plunging oil prices, a stronger dollar — and say the market has already bottomed (!).

  • Stocks opened mixed Tuesday as a pop in commodities and sharp drop in consumer prices briefly offset worries that Congress won't bail out auto makers.

  • The Consumer Price Index had its biggest one month drop ever.  Here is a breakdown of the inflation benchmark to show you where costs are falling most.

  • Stock index futures pared their losses Tuesday after a report showed consumer prices posted their biggest decline in 61 years.

  • On Tuesday, U.S. legislators heard testimony from Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke, the TARP bailout seems to ire everyone — and few can agree what to do with the Big 3 automakers. CNBC's experts offered their views on the economy — and actually found reason for investor hope.

  • Tony Crescenzi

    In arguably one of the most useless pieces of economic news ever, core producer prices increased 0.4% in October, topping forecasts for an increase of 0.1%. The stat is the pretty much the only one within the producer price report that sends a message of rising prices; everything else points to deflation—significant deflation.

  • FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair

    Chairman Frank, Ranking Member Bachus, and Members of the Committee, I appreciate the opportunity to testify on behalf of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) regarding recent efforts to stabilize the nation's financial markets and reduce foreclosures.

  • Ben Bernanke

    Chairman Frank, Ranking Member Bachus, and other members of the Committee, I appreciate having this opportunity to review some of the activities to date of the Treasury's Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP, and to discuss recent steps taken by the Federal Reserve and other agencies to support the normalization of credit markets.

  • Henry Paulson

    Good morning and thank you for the opportunity to testify this morning on implementation of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act. I am grateful and everyone in this country should be grateful, for the efforts of Chairman Frank, ranking member Bachus, this committee and other members of Congress toward adoption of the financial rescue legislation, which created critically important authorities and financial capacity to stabilize our financial system.