×

CNBC U.S. Contributors

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

More

  • Marketing is all about buzz. But if you create something that is immediately banned, does the resulting chatter make up for the lack of exposure?

  • 99cent_only_wedding.jpg

    Today they're expecting big wedding business in Las Vegas, as 9-9-09 is considered a lucky day to tie the knot. Vegas has always been a cheap and quick way to get married. No expensive wedding, no stressing about a guest list. Nothing, however, may be as economical as a the 99 cent weddings being offered to nine couples this morning at the 99 Cents Only store in Hollywood.

  • An advisory committee is set to present the President with his options for NASA after the space shuttle retires, according to reports and...it appears the committee favors outsourcing a lot of future work in space.

  • Winkers Hipnotic Jeans

    I've found it. An American-made product which can defeat terrorism without firing a shot- Winkers jeans. The jeans, created by retired Seattle designer William Jones, "wink" at you if you're walking behind someone wearing them.

  • World's largest Gummy Bear

    Thanks to reader Roy K. for pointing out the World's Largest Gummy Bear, or what I like to call the World's Largest Mistake.

  • Surveillance Camera

    My mom gets by with the help of Social Security and Medicare. She appreciates both programs, and you might think she'd be exactly the type of person the White House wants to help champion healthcare reform. You'd be wrong.

  • Honda Motor HondaJet compact business jet in flight

    When the titans of industry collide, it's usually over buying and selling companies. But two of the richest men in the country are facing off in court...over jet fuel.

  • California Flag

    The state is broke. The hills are on fire. There's no water. Michael Jackson is about to be buried, and there's the horror of Jaycee Lee Dugard's captivity. California's doesn't have much to be proud of lately. The state went into recession first with a collapsing housing market and rising unemployment. Any positive news, any, is embraced as a sign of hope that the worst is over. Well, the following news is quite positive.

  • A bankruptcy judge today ordered that former baseball player Lenny Dykstra lose control of his Chapter 11 bankruptcy, and that management of his financial affairs be handed over to a court appointed trustee.

  • Vegas Homes

    RealtyTrac says Sin City is once again leading the nation in foreclosures. How much worse can things get? Some real estate analysts say it could get worse, that there are an estimated 25,000 homes which banks have repossessed but not yet put on the market.