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Law Legislation

  • google_logo_blue.jpg

    Google and book publishers are expected to show a federal judge in New York a new settlement in the copyright lawsuit over Google's book-scanning project.

  • Gavel

    Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the self-described mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, and four other men accused in the plot will be prosecuted in federal court in New York City, a federal law enforcement official said early on Friday.

  • Google Headquarters

    Switzerland's privacy watchdog is taking legal action to force Google to make changes to its Street View service.

  • Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, California.

    Intel has agreed to pay Advanced Micro Devices $1.25 billion to settle a longstanding dispute between the two companies.

  • Sen. Christopher Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, told CNBC Wednesday that his version of the financial reform bill is a "discussion draft," and there is still room for debate over whether to create a single federal regulator, as well as whether to make an independent consumer protection agency.

  • dollar_bills_pile_1.jpg

    Treasury secretaries have made "a strong dollar policy" the key part of their rhetoric, but the currency has lost nearly a fifth of its value.

  • Credit Cards

    Banks are struggling to make money in the credit card business these days, and consumers are paying the price. Interest rates are going up, credit lines are being cut and a variety of new fees are being imposed on even the best cardholders. The New York Times reports.

  • Doctor Writing

    As health care legislation moves to the Senate, there is a growing criticism that the measure doesn't fulfill President Obama’s promise to slow runaway health care costs, the New York Times reports.

  • credit cards

    Banks expect to tighten terms on credit cards in response to a new law that aims to protect consumers from sudden rate hikes, the Federal Reserve said Monday.

  • Surgeons

    A government health insurance plan included in the House bill is unacceptable to a few Democratic moderates who hold the balance of power in the Senate.

  • The healthcare reform that the House of Representatives approved late Saturday is bad for the US and will actually damage the health care system, Steve Forbes, CEO at Forbes, told CNBC Monday.

  • Nancy Pelosi

    The House passed landmark health care legislation Saturday night to expand coverage to tens of millions who lack it and place tough new restrictions on the insurance industry. The Senate takes up the bill next.

  • handcuffs_suit4.jpg

    The new defendants include hedge fund traders and money managers, a mergers and acquisitions attorney, a corporate executive, and an associate analyst for the Moody's credit rating agency.

  • dollar_bills_pile_1.jpg

    While US officials publicly support a strong dollar, in private they don't appear so worried about its recent slide.

  • JP Morgan Chase

    JPMorgan Chase has agreed to a settlement worth more than $700 million over federal regulators' charges that it made unlawful payments to friends of public officials to win municipal bond business in Jefferson County, Ala.

  • doc_patient_shot_200.jpg

    House Democrats cleared the way Wednesday for a pivotal floor vote on health care overhaul as early as the weekend, after tweaking their 1,900-page bill to crack down harder on insurance companies.

  • Barney Frank

    Rep. Barney Frank says he expects a House bill will allow regulators to dismantle even healthy firms if they've grown so big that they threaten the broader economy.

  • Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff's longtime auditor has entered a guilty plea in a federal court in Manhattan.

  • Amgen

    New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo and 14 other states are filing a lawsuit against Amgen, alleging that the biotech company was offering kickbacks to medical providers to increase the sale of its anemia drug Aranesp.

  • Outside the New York Stock Exchange in lower Manhattan.

    If policy makers want to bring down bank pay, they should do something to make the industry more competitive, and to assure that no one expects the taxpayer to again pay all the costs if the industry blows up again. says Floyd Norris in the New York Times.