×

Law Legislation

  • A U.S. jury has handed a victory to the music recording industry, which had claimed a Minnesota woman infringed song copyrights by using online media to illegally download and distribute music, according to court documents.

  • A bankruptcy judge on Wednesday gave Interstate Bakeries and its largest union 30 more days to either work out their differences or develop plans for the company's future, including a possible sale.

  • Jordan Belfort

    Jordan Belfort is the biggest Wall Street crook you've never heard of. He was the king of funny business (not in the ha-ha way) during the bull market of the '90s, nicknamed "The Wolf of Wall Street." I profile Belfort on "Business Nation" this month, and you'll learn how he created a brokerage called Stratton Oakmont which functioned like a cult.

  • European aerospace group EADS and its shareholders were engulfed in a deepening controversy on Wednesday as the prosecutor's office confirmed it had received a report on insider share trading from French regulators.

  • A federal judge in California certified a class action lawsuit against Target brought by plaintiffs claiming the discount retailer's Web site is inaccessible to the blind, according to court documents.

  • New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was the victim of identity theft, according to the New York County District Attorney's office.

  • Oscar Wyatt

    Texas oilman Oscar Wyatt pleaded guilty Monday to conspiracy to commit wire fraud, one of five counts against him for his role in the U.N. oil-for-food scandal.

  • The Supreme Court Monday rejected a tobacco industry appeal on two issues in a Florida class-action case that has already resulted in a $145 billion punitive award against the cigarette makers being overturned.

  • The European Commission said on Monday it had decided to open formal anti-trust proceedings against Qualcomm over the U.S. company's patent licensing rates for third-generation mobile telephones.

  • A New York Jets season-ticket holder filed a class-action lawsuit Friday against the New England Patriots and coach Bill Belichick for "deceiving customers."

  • The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Bloomberg LP on Thursday, alleging the news service had discriminated against pregnant employees by cutting their pay and demoting them.

  • Siemens's review of corruption allegations has identified more than 1.5 billion euros ($2.1 billion) in suspicious payments dating back 10 to 12 years, sources close to its supervisory board said on Thursday.

  • A union filed a shareholder lawsuit against Moody's on Wednesday claiming the rating agency did not tell investors it "assigned excessively high ratings" to bonds backed by subprime mortgages.

  • A California appeals court on Tuesday declined to reinstate a long-running case against the Walt Disney over royalties it paid for its popular Winnie the Pooh character.

  • knicks.jpg

    No matter what happens with the New York Knicks sexual harassment trial, the fans won't turn away. All the crisis PR people who keep going on television and talking to the newspapers, whining that the Knicks "brand" is getting damaged, should challenge themselves to come up with a number of people they think will not renew their season tickets solely because of this.

  • Four out of five businesses worldwide have been hurt by some type of corporate fraud in the last three years, according to a survey commissioned by risk consultant Kroll.

  • A European Union proposal to stop people from accessing bomb-making instructions online is fraught with technical difficulties, if not downright unworkable, Internet practitioners say.

  • Apple

    Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs was asked by U.S. securities regulators to give a deposition in a lawsuit against the company's former general counsel involving stock options backdating, Bloomberg reported, citing two people familiar with the matter.

  • A shareholder in BAE Systems has filed a lawsuit against the British defense company's board and other individuals which seeks damages stemming from past arms deals with Saudi Arabia.

  • A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld a Delaware judge's rejection of billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian's claims that he was defrauded in the 1998 merger of DaimlerBenz and Chrysler.