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Business Middle East

  • economy_down1.jpg

    Caveat emptor: The first-quarter economy is slowing and inflation is rising. A month ago, economists were optimistic about the potential for 4 percent growth. Now they are marking down their estimates toward 2.5 percent. Behind this, consumer expectations are falling while inflation fears are going up.

  • One euro and U.S. dollar

    Investors are so focused on the troubles in Japan and Libya that the euro is just strengthening on the sidelines, this analyst says. But for how long?

  • JetBlue Flight Plan  for $100 Oil

    A look at the airline's strategy for the rise in oil, with Dave Barger, JetBlue Airways chief executive officer.

  • Egyptian anti-government protesters wave a Tunisian flag along with national banners during continuing demonstrations in Cairo's landmark Tahrir Square.

    Egypt's stock exchange will re-open Wednesday after being closed for more than seven weeks, a spokesman for the exchange said on Monday after the country's new Prime Minister accepted the resignation of the exchange's chairman.

  • Saudi youth wave their national flag as they celebrate the return of King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz in the Saudi capital Riyadh.

    Saudi Arabia's plan to shell out some $90 billion as part of a state-backed economic aid package continued to buoy regional markets Monday, but it is too early to tell how much the spending package will do to assuage sectarian tensions in the country, market analysts told CNBC.

  • The past week saw plenty of action in the currency markets, but commodities went on a ride as well. From "Money In Motion", tips on using currencies to trade commodities.

  • Changing Global Outlook

    CNBC's Steve Liesman takes a look at how economists are changing their forecasts in response to recent events.

  • Having analyzed the impact on the dollar of numerous wars and military interventions in the Middle East since 1973, Bank of New York Mellon is telling investors that the greenback should hold up well as the international community imposes a no-fly zone over Libya.

  • With civil unrest spreading from the Middle East to other countries around the world with the help of social networking, it seems that no authoritarian ruler is safe. With this in mind, the question is who's next? The sudden disintegration of the multi-decade rule of leaders like Hosni Mubarak suggests that other long-standing dictators could go.Although Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and North Korea's Kim Jong Il draw the world's attention, the list of rulers considered to be dictators is a long one.A

    So, which dictators have been in power the longest and how have their economies fared under their rule? Find out!

  • President Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama demanded Friday that Moammar Gaddafi halt all military attacks against civilians and said that if the Libyan leader did not stand down the United States would join in military action against him.

  • Hollywood sign

    Despite the upheaval roiling the markets, Wall Street analysts continue to issue upbeat reports about media companies, and even the negative reports don't mention the headlines — they simply don't have the exposure to Japan and the rest of the market instability as many other sectors.

  • Libyans at the rebel-held eastern town of Brega celebrate after rumor spread that their fighters took over the town of Ras Lanuf from pro-Kadhafi forces during battles.

    The Libyan government announced an immediate cease fire on Friday morning—just hours after the U.N. authorized the use of force against the Qaddafi regime to protect civilians.

  • Don't get too caught up in this rally, the "Mad Money" host said.

  • A Libyan rebel fighter flashs the victory sign as he carries rocket propelled grenades at a check point near the key city of Ajdabiya on March 23, 2011 as government forces have encircled the town.

    It is often said that a picture speaks a thousand words, but these images arguably speak volumes about the violence and political turmoil in Libya and Bahrain.

  • Passengers line up for flights out of Bahrain at the country's airport March 17.

    "A sense of calm with an undercurrent of mild panic," is how one Bahraini described the scene at Bahrain International Airport Thursday morning,after the Bahrain Defense Force (BDF) cleared the country's Pearl Roundabout area of anti-government protestors, killing at least three people.

  • Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao pledged to tackle public concerns such as inflation, runaway growth, and corruption in an apparent bid to defuse a call for weekly rallies in 13 Chinese cities as similar issues touched off political convulsions in the Middle East and North Africa.

    As unrest spreads throughout the Middle East, western observers like Elizabeth Economy of the Council on Foreign Relations argue China’s government might collapse. The reasoning? Unhappiness over economic disparity. They also believe the demand for materialism is being replaced by desire for political plurality.

  • Fukishima nuclear reactor explosion.

    The complexity and uncertainty surrounding Japan's nuclear crisis has created a great divide between investors who are now running from risk and those who think they can ride it out.

  • Cramer has advice for investors who want to sell stocks now.

  • Consider these five dividend-paying stocks, the "Mad Money" host said.

  • The yen rallied to a new all-time high against the dollar as traders speculated G-7 central bankers may be getting ready to intervene to drive the currency lower.