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Business Middle East

  • A Bahraini anti-regime protester holds up a poster with a caricature image of Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa calling him a "war criminal" during a demonstration in the capital Manama.

    The Bahrain military plans to secure the country's capital Tuesday night, clearing the Pearl Roundabout where protests have been held since mid-February, and securing government buildings, sources in the country told CNBC.

  • The International Energy Agency says Libyan oil exports have "ground to a halt" because of the fighting between rebels and forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

  • Protesters run from a cloud of teargas during a clash with Bahraini security forces near the Pearl roundabout in Manama, Bahrain. Protesters said that the army fired on them with live rounds, followed by teargas which drove the demonstrators back. There are unconfirmed reports that there are four dead in the clashes.

    The U.S. State Department urged U.S. citizens on Tuesday to defer travel to Bahrain and suggested Americans there should leave due to ongoing political and civil unrest.

  • Following the huge losses on the Nikkei, with more than $700 billion dollars wiped off the Japanese market in just two sessions, one economist is predicting the tragic events in Japan will be an "excuse" 'to move to quantitative easing in all major markets.

  • A rebel fighter greets a crowd of comrades while heading towards the frontline in Ajdabiya, Libya.

    Despite Japan's massive earthquake and tsunami's impact on global markets, the escalating violence in the Middle East still poses the biggest threat for investors, according to Shawn Matthews, CEO of Cantor Fitzgerald, a privately-owned investment bank.

  • A Bahraini anti-regime protester holds up a poster with a caricature image of Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa calling him a "war criminal" during a demonstration in the capital Manama.

    General confusion reigns and businesses prepare for another day off as Gulf Cooperation Council forces deploy in Bahrain.

  • Protests in Libya

    Pressure is building for the US to take action in Libya.

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters gather in Pearl Square, in Manama.

    Forces from Gulf Arab countries will help with maintaining order in Bahrain and some forces have already arrived in the country, according to press reports.

  • Libyan rebel fighters stand ready with anti-aircraft weapons at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Ras Lanuf on March 6, 2011 which in spite of air strikes by the regime, the key oil pipeline hub was still in rebel hands, AFP correspondents reported, countering claims by a state-owned television that it had been recaptured. AFP PHOTO / MARCO LONGARI (Photo credit should read MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

    The leader of Libya’s rebellion has warned countries that have failed to support the uprising against Muammer Gaddafi that they would be denied access to Libya’s vast oil riches if the regime is deposed, the Financial Times reports.

  • Soldiers pull a boat across floodwater as they help to evacuate residents of Tagajo city, Miyagi

    Traders went home Friday thinking about Japan's tragic earthquake and tsunami, more possible unrest in the Middle East, and Europe's sovereign debt problems.

  • Prince Alwaleed bin Talal al Saud, the nephew of King Abdullah

    Here’s the complete transcript of Maria Bartiromo’s exclusive interview with Prince Alwaleed bin Talal al Saud.

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    Citigroup’s shakiest days are over, Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal al Saud, the biggest single individual shareholder of the bank’s stock and chairman of Kingdom Holding Company, which also holds Citi stock, told CNBC Friday.

  • Saudi Prince One on One

    Discussing the Middle East's need for reform as well as oil supply issues, with Prince Alwaleed bin Talal al Saud, Saudi Arabia, Kingdom Holding Company.

  • Protests in Libya

    Saudi Arabia has handed out about $37 billion, while Oman, Bahrain, Libya and Kuwait have boosted domestic spending up to 4 percent of GDP. The result is the sovereign wealth funds are less able to invest overseas.

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    Fear in the markets is palpable. Reports of unrest in Saudi Arabia, and the devastation caused by Japan's massive earthquake having many thinking the global economic recovery could be at risk.

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    Tensions are high in Saudi Arabia in expectations of protests akin to the ones that have swept across the Arab World. CNBC's Yousef Gamal El-Din reports.

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    The biggest earthquake on record to hit Japan in 140 years sent stock markets across the globe sharply lower, while the yen and oil prices also fell.

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    Saudi Arabia is bracing for protesters to take to the streets on Friday—in what they are referring to as a 'Day of Rage'.

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    Police and protesters clashed in Saudi Arabia Thursday and the country faces a day of possible mass protests Friday, but even heavy demonstrations will not succeed in removing the current regime, according to analysts at the Eurasia Group.

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    Reports of police firing on protestors in the Saudi Arabian city of Qatif evoke a possible nightmare scenario for the disruption of oil from a country that sits atop the world's largest proven oil reserves.