Top News & Analysis North America

  • U.S. employers are still taking a wait-and-see approach to adding jobs, according to a Manpower survey released Tuesday.

  • Warner Music Group  said on Monday it was still considering making an offer for Britain's EMI which has agreed to a 2.4 billion pounds ($4.7 billion) cash takeover from private equity group Terra Firma.

  • Norilsk Nickel, the world's largest nickel and palladium miner, said on Friday 2006 net profit more than doubled on record prices and the sale of a stake in South African miner Gold Fields.

  • The Bush administration is poised to suspend a major post-9/11 security initiative to cope with increasingly angry complaints from Americans whose summer vacations are threatened by new passport rules.

  • U.S. securities regulators are planning to fine Nortel Networks  up to $100 million for accounting fraud, Bloomberg reported on its Web site on Friday.

  • Bank of America has accused a Dutch court of unlawful action by blocking its $21 billion purchase of ABN Amro's U.S. unit LaSalle Bank in an appeal filing, the Financial Times reported on Friday.

  • A global solution is needed to tackle climate change and the inclusion of the United States in any agreement is vital, European Commission President José Manuel Barroso president, told CNBC Europe.

  • Sony's  game unit said on Thursday it planned to cut jobs in the United States and was eyeing restructuring steps in Japan as it struggles to keep up with industry rival Nintendo.

  • A federal appeals court grapples Wednesday with a billion-dollar legal question: Are insurance companies obligated to cover water damage from the failure of levees in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina?

  • Whole Foods Market, the world's largest organic and natural foods chain, opens its first store outside North America in London on Wednesday and plans hundreds more in Britain and across Europe.

  • Leaders of the G8 powers will call this week for greater vigilance on hedge funds in the hope that the industry will take it upon itself to prevent accidents like the collapse of LTCM in the late 1990s.

  • Virgin Group founder Richard Branson plans business class-only flights with a fleet of up to 15 new planes, in a move which could spell trouble for upstart rivals in the competitive transatlantic market.

  • Facing a grim housing market, Pulte Homes  said Tuesday that it is cutting about 16% of its work force, or about 1,900 jobs, as part of a restructuring.

  • IntercontinentalExchange, on Thursday took its unsolicited takeover proposal for the Chicago Board of Trade directly to members of the CBOT, urging them to support ICE's bid over that of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

  • ABN Amro urged a Royal Bank of Scotland-led consortium and Bank of America to settle their dispute over the acquisition of ABN's U.S. unit, LaSalle, as the subsidiary's future remains a sticking point in the takeover battle for the Dutch bank, the Financial Times reported Friday.

  • Ernst & Young and Deutsche Bank could face monetary sanctions rather than criminal charges in a U.S. tax shelter probe, The Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday, citing unnamed sources.

  • The energy market could have a new benchmark oil price when Dubai launches its Middle East sour crude futures contract as an alternative to New York's NYMEX light crude oil futures and London's IPE Brent crude oil.

  • Former Federal Reserve Board vice chairman Preston Martin died Wednesday at his home in San Francisco after a brief illness, his family said in a statement. He was 83.

  • Robert Zoellick has dealt with the Cold War, the killing in Darfur, China's rise as an economic colossus. His next challenge: to restore confidence at the badly shaken World Bank.

  • A gauge of U.S. online recruitment activity rose for a fifth straight month in May as demand for workers eased slightly but remained strong, a global online careers and recruiting firm, said on Thursday.