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Exchanges NYSE

  • Mad Money, December 29, 2011

    Mad Money host and former hedge fund manager, Jim Cramer, provides stock traders with all manner of investing advice.

  • Amazon.com

    If you want exposure to the ongoing migration from brick-and-mortar retailers and toward online retailing, it may be wiser to seek out more attractively valued names other than Amazon.com.

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    While both professionals and do-it-yourself investors try to prognosticate the new year, we're always dealt our fair share of surprises — good and bad. Here are five stocks that turned in the biggest negative surprises for investors.

  • In the new year, hope for yield hunters returns as companies rewarded for paying higher dividends begin to pressure those that don't, David Katz, Matrix Asset Advisors' chief investment officer told CNBC.

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    The euro’s dramatic slide to the year’s lows in light trading is a likely prelude to more weakening in the New Year and highlights the long haul ahead for the euro zone’s debt crisis.

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    While 2011 has been a tough year for hedge fund investors, with a new trading year just a few sessions away, investors are looking for a new set of investment ideas for 2012. TheStreet.com analyzes stocks that hedge funds are buying right now.

  • Investors should have a long-range plan and buy stocks rather than bonds, Oakmark Fund portfolio manager Bill Nygren tells CNBC.

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    If weekly jobless claims once more show improvement Thursday, they could provide the magic needed to put stocks back in the black for the year.

  • Fast Money Web Extra

    The Fast Money crew offers special CNBC.com-only advice on your investments.

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    The health care sector had a good year in 2011 — the group was one of only two sectors out of 10 major categories within the S&P 1200 to deliver positive returns on both a price and total return basis. But 2012 brings a new set of challenges, reports TheStreet.com.

  • Apple Store

    Since Apple moved into the greeting-card and online-photo space two months ago, financial analysts appear not to have noticed, reports TheStreet.com.

  • Forget the traditional ways of generating investment ideas. Instead, let the crowd do it for you. From hedge funds to individual investors, scores of market participants are turning to social media to figure out which stocks are worth watching.

  • Straight of Hormuz map

    Pending sanctions against Iran are designed to cause swifter economic pain than past penalties, and Iran is ramping up rhetoric in response.

  • It will take until the second half of 2012 before the impact of this year's flooding in Thailand is lessened for semiconductor companies, FBR Capital Markets senior analyst Craig Berger told CNBC Wednesday.

  • When GNC hit the market in April, it had its fair share of critics. But GNC has emerged as the top IPO in a year where six percent less money was raised than 2010, according to the Wall Street Journal.

  • In 2012, the weakened European economy will likely hurt multinationals more than domestic U.S. companies in the consumer staples sector, John Faucher, JP Morgan senior analyst, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Netflix has a lot to prove in 2012, specifically how successful it can be in the U.K. and Ireland. The company, whose stock lost 70 percent of its value just in the past three months, is so confident in the future of its streaming business overseas that it is even willing to take a loss in the new year.

  • Prime Minister Yoshiko Noda and President Hu Jintao

    China’s surprise currency deal with Japan does little to chip away at the dollar’s reign as reserve currency, but it could foreshadow an era when the yuan becomes more influential, first in Asia, then around the globe.

  • Sears

    Vendors who loan to retail suppliers of Sears are already starting to pull back and could distance themselves further from the company if things don't change soon.

  • Sears' decision to close up to 120 Kmart stores shows a retailer struggling to draw shoppers at a time of increasing competition, Credit Suisse retail analyst Gary Balter told CNBC.