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Top News & Analysis Ohio

  • Thieves have claimed billions of dollars in bogus tax refunds from the IRS by swiping the Social Security numbers and identities of ordinary people.

  • Ford's plan to boost jobs

    Joe Hinrichs, Ford Motor Company president of the Americas, discusses the automaker's plans to invest $500 million in a plant in Lima, Ohio which will create 300 jobs. At Ford we've been hiring over 10,000 workers in the last couple years and growing our investments here, says Hinrichs.

  • Hospitals and medical practices are preparing for confusion and hassles as new insurance plans under President Obama's healthcare law take effect.

  • Protesters at a rally against low wages for fast-food workers, in front of a McDonald's, Dec. 5, 2013, in Phoenix.

    As many as 11 other states and Washington, D.C., are expected to consider increases in 2014. USA Today reports.

  • Tesla Model S cars are displayed at a Tesla showroom in Palo Alto, Calif.

    A group of Ohio car dealerships has become the latest group to sue Tesla over its direct-to-consumer business model.

  • Mary Barra

    On the heels of appointing its first female CEO, General Motors said its $1.3 billion investment at five plants will create or retain 1,000 jobs.

  • Workers at a shop selling paintings made from precious stone in Yen Bai, about 300 kms north of Hanoi.

    Mirroring Cleveland, not Mountain View, Calif., may be a more realistic way for developing economies to encourage entrepreneurship.

  • In crisis: Trenton police on patrol in the Garden State's capitol

    Wider efforts to rebuild America's deeply depressed cities can't succeed until public safety is restored.

  • Ford Motor Co. said it will invest $200 million to make four-cylinder engines at the Ford Motor Co. Cleveland Engine Plant in Brook Park, Ohio.

    Even struggling metros are having success in attracting investment. In the process, they are creating a virtuous cycle of creativity.

  • Orlando, Florida

    These sunshine cities have focused their efforts on developing new industry niches to strengthen their local economies and promote future growth.

  • Miami at night

    The ebbing economic tide from the Great Recession revealed some of the worst swindles in municipal finance in decades.

  • Detroit city grate is missing a cover. With cut backs to city services, Detroit's infrastructure has fallen into disrepair.

    Detroit's bankruptcy, and rumblings about tax overhaul, have fueled a big sell off in the municipal bond market. What's next?

  • Home of Charles Lang Freer, Detroit railroad car manufacturer.

    Visit any American city and it doesn't take a whole lot of imagination to see where its greatness came from—however faded it may seem to be.

  • On the waterfront: Market Street Bridge and the Tennessee Aquarium

    Chattanooga has made a comeback over the last 5 years thanks to investing in high-speed broadband. In the process, it has wooed $4 billion in foreign investment.

  • A construction crew fixing aging water pipes in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Federal and state funding cutbacks are challenging Main Street. The future of America is at stake since cities contribute more than 90 percent to GDP.

  • View of downtown Oakland, California.

    Interest rate swaps - sold as a way to save money on public financing - have turned into municipal bombs.

  • Lawrence Payne walks past two abandoned houses on September 4, 2013 in the Six Mile Gratiot neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan.

    The head of the National Urban League outlines a plan to close the economic divide that's crippling U.S. cities.

  • Apek Supercritical C02 Extractor

    Apeks Supercritical sells an extraction machine for medical marijuana users who prefer consuming oils over smoking the plant.

  • Tea party activist William Temple protests in front of he U.S. Supreme Court in June 2012.

    Tea party candidates in the 2014 congressional elections will try to unseat Republican incumbents they say aren't conservative enough.

  • Bigfoot?!

    Big data has been used for a variety of things, but its latest use might be its most strange yet: The hunt for Bigfoot.