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Intellectual Property Patents

  • iPad

    One after another, like moths to a flame, technology companies have been seduced into entering the market for tablets. Apple made it look so irresistible, with 29 million eager and sometimes fanatical consumers snapping up an iPad in the device’s first 15 months, the NYT reports.

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    Invention and innovation can change how an economy, a company, even the human body, works — quickly and profoundly. Our special report, "The Future of Innovation," is about defining innovation in the 21st century, and seeking out where it is alive and well in America.

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    Necessity no longer seems to be the mother of invention. The disposable consumer society has facilitated rapid-paced innovation that has blurred the line between good and bad.

  • Man with wings

    Great new ideas are only the first link in a chain that includes government and corporate allies in an economy that supports risk.

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    What a terrible time to try to sell an innovation. Oh, for the boom years of a decade ago, when investment capital was as plentiful as the dew.

  • Future of Innovation - See Complete Coverage

    Depending on whom you ask, there's divergence about which entrepreneur, brand, and product is the most innovative — as technology strikes a different chord with each generation.

  • Future of Innovation - See Complete Coverage

    As the pace of innovation quickens, finding an edge is becoming harder.  How can the U.S. nurture innovation?

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    As the landscape of innovation becomes increasingly global, there's growing concern that the U.S is no longer the leader.

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    A growing number of parents and educators are leveraging technology to transform grade-school education into a stay-at-home, online experience, partly because of shrinking public budgets and curricula.

  • Peter Thiel, founder of the Theil Foundation and is a technology entrepreneur, investor, and philanthropist.

    Some of the the best tech innovators are college dropouts. Now one of them is paying aspiring ones to quit school and brainstorm.  Peter Thiel's fellowship program is now underway.

  • Charlotte, North Carolina

    The city of Charlotte, N.C. and a handful of major companies are hoping cutting-edge technology can show 82,000 workers in the biggest downtown office towers how to save energy

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    Recent blockbuster patent deals are fed largely by legal considerations, not economic ones, analysts say, the New York Times reports.

  • WOTS Now: Google's Big Buy

    The Fast Money traders weigh in on trades to play today. Also, Colin Gillis, BGC Partners, takes a look at why Google is snapping up Motorola Mobility and what it means to the competition.

  • Apple

    The U.S. arbiter for trade disputes has rejected Apple's claims that photography pioneer Kodak violated Apple's patents covering digital camera technology.

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    Businesses in Hawaii, New Hampshire, and Vermont can rest easy knowing their workers enjoy the best quality of life.  Not so for Delaware, Louisiana, and Alabama, which ranked last this year.

  • Allen Stanford

    The court-appointed receiver who is recovering assets for investors in Allen Stanford's alleged Ponzi scheme is demanding that Libya's sovereign wealth funds return millions of dollars they somehow managed to withdraw just before the firm blew up in 2009, CNBC has learned.

  • Sen. Chuch Schumer

    For years, big banks have paid hundreds of millions of dollars to a tiny Texas company to use a patented system for processing digital copies of checks, making Claudio Ballard, the inventor of the system, a wealthy man and the bank industry’s biggest patent foe. Getting fed up, the banks turned to their best friend in Congress. The New York Times reports.

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    Former Enron Chief Financial Officer Andy Fastow has been transferred to a Houston halfway house as he prepares to be released from prison later this year.

  • Woman using laptop in internet cafe

    Righthaven, a Nevada company, finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web and obtains the copyrights. Then it sues, the New York Times reports.

  • Bratz Dolls

    A federal court jury has rejected Mattel Inc.'s copyright infringement claims involving MGA Entertainment's popular line of Bratz dolls and awarded MGA $88.4 million for misappropriation of its trade secrets by the Barbie-maker.