Business News Patrick J. Leahy

  • New bollard-style U.S.-Mexico border fencing is seen next to vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, March 5, 2019.

    The White House is targeting a windfall from an international banking scandal to help pay for the border wall, according to an administration official.

  • WASHINGTON, March 11- President Donald Trump called on Monday for spending more U.S. taxpayer money on the military and a U.S.- Mexico border wall, while overhauling social safety-net programs in a budget plan likely to die in Congress but live on in his 2020 re-election campaign. The $4.7 trillion plan asks for $8.6 billion to build a wall on the border with...

  • WASHINGTON, March 11- President Donald Trump on Monday called for spending more money on the military and a U.S.- Mexico border wall while overhauling social programs for the poor in a budget plan that sets the stage for his next fight with the U.S. Congress. "President Trump has somehow managed to produce a budget request even more untethered from reality than...

  • WASHINGTON, March 11- President Donald Trump in his 2020 budget on Monday called for overhauling social programs that help poor and elderly Americans, while boosting military spending and funding a U.S.- Mexico border wall, in the opening gambits in his next funding fight with the U.S. Congress. The Republican president's $4.7 trillion budget was immediately...

  • The Republican president's move to circumvent Congress represented a new approach to making good on a 2016 presidential campaign pledge to halt the flow of undocumented immigrants into the country, whom Trump says bring crime and drugs. He was also expected later on Friday to sign a bipartisan government spending bill Congress approved on Thursday that...

  • Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy and Republican Senator Richard Shelby spoke to reporters during a break in private meetings they have been holding with two of their House of Representatives counterparts. The stalled talks restarted in the U.S. Capitol just hours before a scheduled rally in the Texas border city of El Paso, where President Donald Trump will...

  • The talks, which had broken down over the weekend, restarted in the U.S. Capitol just hours before a scheduled rally in the Texas border city of El Paso where President Donald Trump will promote his promised wall along the U.S.- Mexico border, a proposal opposed by Democrats. An anti-wall protest will greet the Republican president, led by hometown Democrat Beto...

  • The talks were scheduled to resume in Washington hours before Republican President Donald Trump plans a rally in the Texas border city of El Paso, where he is expected to promote his long-promised wall along the U.S.- Mexico border. An anti-wall protest will greet the Republican president, led by hometown Democrat Beto O'Rourke, the former congressman who is...

  • The talks were scheduled to resume in Washington hours before Republican President Donald Trump plans a rally in the Texas border city of El Paso where he is expected to promote his long-promised wall along the U.S.- Mexico border. An anti-wall protest will greet the Republican president, led by hometown Democrat Beto O'Rourke, the former congressman who in...

  • Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., speaks with reporters in the Senate subway on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018.

    Despite Shelby's confidence, it is unclear whether Trump will back an agreement reached by lawmakers.

  • The president, who previously had insisted on the inclusion of $5.7 billion to help pay for a wall along the vast U.S.- Mexico border in any legislation to fund government agencies, was scheduled to deliver remarks soon at the White House. The arrangement, which would require passage in the House of Representatives and Senate and Trump's signature, would leave...

  • Jan 23- U.S. Senate Democrats are questioning the legal basis of the Trump administration's move to continue work on its five-year offshore drilling plan during the partial federal government shutdown. In a letter sent on Tuesday to David Bernhardt, the Department of Interior's acting secretary, and Walter Cruickshank, acting director of the Bureau of Ocean...

  • Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.

    "The one thing I've learned from John McCain above all else is that, in moments like this, you have to embrace your values," Graham said. "No more transactional interactions."

  • People wait in line to attend the opening day of the new term of the Supreme Court in Washington, October 1, 2018. 

    In Madison v. Alabama, the first death penalty case of the term, the high court will address the role of memory in capital punishment for the first time in its history.

  • Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.  (Photo by Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images)

    During a testy exchange with Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., Kavanaugh declined to say whether his life inspired the similarly named character who appears in the 1997 book "Wasted: Tales of a Gen X Drunk," written by his high school friend Mark Judge.

  • Dr. Christine Blasey Ford arrives before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. 

    It was not a 15-year-old high school student who answered lawmakers' questions about Brett Kavanaugh's alleged sexual misconduct, it was who Christine Blasey Ford is now: A 51-year-old research psychologist.

  • Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), talks to reporters about the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh in the wake of a woman's accusation that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her 36 years ago, on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 18, 2018

    In a letter to Trump, all Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee urged the president to pull Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination. 

  • Brett Kavanaugh, U.S. Supreme Court associate justice nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. 

    Kavanaugh has deepened questions about his present-day credibility – a bedrock requirement for the lifetime job he now seeks.

  • Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) questions Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. 

    The suit, filed in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, is in relation to two Freedom of Information Act requests submitted by members of the committee in early August.

  • Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh answers questions during the second day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. 

    After professor Christine Blasey Ford went public over the weekend with allegations that Kavanaugh drunkenly held her down and groped her during a party in the early 1980s, Kavanaugh's chances for confirmation have been thrust into uncertainty.