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Legislation Regulations

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    Bradley Birkenfeld once lived the high life as secret Swiss banker at UBS in Geneva. Then he delivered some of the world’s best-kept secrets to the US government, expecting a great reward. And now he sits in federal prison in Pennsylvania.

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    Cheryl Eckard became the largest individual whistleblower award recipient ever, hauling in a $96 million bounty as her reward for providing information to the government about manufacturing problems at GlaxoSmithKline.

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    Have you ever been tempted to blow the whistle on something suspicious you've witnesses in the workplace? Take our poll and share your opinion.

  • Mortgage

    The Obama administration and House Republicans are settling into a game of chicken over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, with each side daring the other to advance a plan. The NYT reports.

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    Forget what you think you know about lone whistleblowers taking on giant corporations all by themselves. These days, there's a cottage industry to support—and profit from—whistleblowing.

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    When President Barack Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform act into law last summer, very few in the financial industry knew that the bill included a massive change in the way whistleblowing law works in this country.

  • Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro

    Some Wall Street lawyers have been lobbying Congress to get more money for the Securities and Exchange Commission, which faces a budget freeze. The New York Times reports.

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    That promise of cash is providing a new incentive for employees to reveal wrongdoing in their companies. What would you do?

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    Wall Street is suddenly paying attention to the culture of whistleblowing, because the new Dodd-Frank financial reform law, for the first time, extends whistleblower provisions to Wall Street, meaning employees who expose fraud and wrongdoing stand to collect between 10 and 30 percent of the amount recovered by the government.

  • UBS

    Delays in the announcement of the bonuses at UBS were not due to executives' unhappiness about the size of the bonus pool, UBS CEO Oswald Gruebel told CNBC Tuesday.

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    Taking a look at the biggest fraud cases of all time, and you're left with just one question: What's wrong with the pharmaceutical industry?

  • Government Regulation

    Dean Baker has provided a provocative and must-read response to the report of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission.

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    CNBC's personal finance expert Suze Orman talks about repaying student loans.

  • Foreclosure

    What leaked last week was the idea of reducing Fannie, Freddie and FHA loan limits, currently at $729,750 for high-priced markets to $625,000.

  • New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)

    Intent on fixing a banking system that contributed heavily to the recent financial crisis, lawmakers and regulators pushed Wall Street to overhaul its pay practices. But it turns out that executives have a way to get around those best-laid plans. The NYT reports.

  • New York Stock Exchange trader

    With memories of last May's "Flash Crash" still fresh, now comes warning of a market meltdown that could extend beyond stocks—a "Splash Crash" that would include currencies, commodities and bonds.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission seal hangs on the facade of its building in Washington, DC.

    If a company’s financial reporting were so bad that its auditor had pointed out significant weaknesses in its accounting for seven years running, the Securities and Exchange Commission would most likely be all over it.  But what if the company were the S.E.C. itself the New York Times asks.

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    Top European Union officials will on Wednesday call for curbs on derivatives markets and greater use of trade policy to reduce volatility in commodity prices and improve the bloc’s access to key raw materials.

  • Lewis said he found it “amazing” that the Irish government has “socialized” the banks—some $80 billion in senior and subordinated debt—and made it the financial responsibility of Irish taxpayers, who didn’t create it.