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Legislation Regulations

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    The compensation whiplash from the great economic train wreck has been “say on pay” and calls for greater transparency. Who could argue against transparency? But transparency should not be replaced with a false sense of security – a focus on form and not substance.

  • Allen Stanford

    US securities regulators have broadened their investigation into the alleged $8 billion Ponzi scheme run by Allen Stanford, the Texan billionaire, to include brokerage executives who invested their clients’ money in Stanford International Bank products, reports the Financial Times.

  • The Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange

    Eight months after a Securities and Exchange Commission lawsuit raised tough questions about its business standards, Goldman Sachs is completing a report on its structure and practices intended to quell fears that its ethics have lapsed.

  • Financier Bernard Madoff with his wife Ruth Madoff and son Mark Madoff during November 2001 in Long Island, NY.

    In addition to Mark Madoff's children being sued—three days before his suicide—by Bankruptcy Trustee Irving Picard, Mark Madoff himself was implicated in another lawsuit Picard filed on Friday.

  • Two powerful lame-duck senators, who both support the tax bill compromise set for a Senate vote Monday, told CNBC Monday, that reducing the deficit will come after the economy is gets moving forward.

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    Credit card offers are surging again after a three-year slowdown, as banks seek to revive a business that brought them huge profits before the financial crisis wrecked the credit scores of so many Americans, the New York Times reports.

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    Credit Suisse’s chief executive said he hoped to begin issuing billions of dollars in contingent-capital bonds in the next year to help shore up the bank’s financial strength well ahead of new Swiss regulations. The FT reports.

  • Financier Bernard Madoff with his wife Ruth Madoff and son Mark Madoff during November 2001 in Long Island, NY.

    For two years, the two sons of jailed financier Bernard Madoff portrayed themselves as honest whistleblowers of their father's historic fraud. A court-appointed trustee depicted them as bungling money managers who did nothing to protect investors.

  • Perhaps there’s a lesson to be learned from the Germans whose economy has bounced back from the recession quicker that the US’s and who have a workforce that is, largely, working.

  • Peter Orszag

    Obama’s former director of the Office of Management and Budget, Peter Orszag, told CNBC Friday that he’s concerned that the new Congress could stymie the health-care bill by blocking funding.

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    For the first quarter, Green Mountain Roasters guided to a range of 14 cents to 18 cents a share, which was below street estimates. And remember, it offered up that 4 cent spread even though it only two weeks left in that quarter.

  • United States Federal Reserve

    The surge in the municipal bond market is widely credited to foreign interest in the taxable bonds that dozens of states have issued under the Build America Bond program, reports the New York Times.

  • Bernie Madoff

    We knew immediately this was going to be the largest fraud ever, by a long shot. And it was. $18 billion. Almost ten times larger than any other Ponzi scheme. It became clear very early that the direct Madoff investors were doomed.

  • capitol_building_wallst_mainst.jpg

    On Tuesday, President Obama cited the extension of the long term jobless benefits as one of the major reasons for why he was willing to compromise on tax cuts for high income earners. With the unemployment rate increasing to 9.8%, almost every economist and strategist on CNBC believed that this extension was the humane thing to do to help them.

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    Federal rule makers, long the neglected stepchildren of Washington bureaucrats, suddenly find themselves at the center of power as they scramble to work out details of hundreds of sweeping financial and health care regulations that will ultimately affect most Americans. The New York Times reports.

  • In late 2006, the German engineering giant Siemens, one of world’s largest companies, was engulfed in a corruption scandal.

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    The Federal Communications Commission will consider changes to the rules governing negotiations between cable providers and broadcast networks to prevent broadcast stations from removing their signals from cable companies if the parties fail to agree on retransmission fees. The New York Times reports.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The surge in 10-year Treasury yields above the psychological 3 percent level this week crowns a miserable period for bond traders and investors who bet on the Federal Reserve’s second round of quantitative easing policy, or QE2, being bullish for the market, reports the Financial Times.

  • Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.), the incoming chairman of the House Budget Committee, told CNBC Wednesday that he would push for permanent lower tax rates, "real" spending cuts and entitlement reforms when Republicans take control of the House in January.

  • Member of Iran's Revolutionary Guard

    The Revolutionary Guard  is  a major force when it comes to controlling Iran's economy. Many Iranians in and out of the country have called the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps "Iran's mafia."