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Legislation Regulations

  • The one bank that really wins with FinReg.

  • The financial overhaul bill will end the prospect of government bailouts of financial giants considered ''too big to fail," Rep. Barney Frank (D-Ma.) told CNBC Friday.

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    The movie studios are celebrating a ban on box-office futures trading that was included in the final financial reform legislation. At about 1 am eastern a House-Senate conference committee agreed to adopt the Senate's language banning the trading of derivatives based on box office revenue.

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    The new limits on proprietary trading and hedge fund investments may actually benefit big banks more than harm them—especially in the hedge funds they market to clients.

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    Now, with financial reform set to be implemented in Washington, there will be fewer unknown unknowns. This will contribute to a healing of the U.S. credit system. Moreover, the November election is likely to lead to more balance in the House and Senate, which means that the worst of the regulatory cloud and government involvement will soon pass. This could rally risk assets if this viewpoint becomes popular. Still, challenges remain.

  • So what exactly is the real message of the tea parties? And how large an impact will they have on the upcoming elections? These are just a couple of the questions I posed to my old friends Rick Santelli and Lou Dobbs on last night’s Kudlow Report.

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    US lawmakers hammered out a historic overhaul of financial regulations as dawn broke over the nation's capital Friday, handing President Barack Obama a major domestic policy victory on the eve of a global summit devoted to financial reform

  • Government Regulation

    The financial regulation bill agreed upon by Congressional leaders overnight is too weak and will not reform the system, Williams Isaac, former chiarman of the FDIC, told CNBC.

  • President Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama says he's "gratified" by the deal that Congress has worked out on overhauling Wall Street rules.

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    The real work now, the real test for President Obama and Treasury Secretary Geithner, is to quickly bring the rest of the world along on the only reforms that will truly protect the global financial system from crisis in the future: common standards for the appropriate quantity and quality of capital, and acceptable levels of leverage and liquidity.

  • Columns and steps

    The financial reform bill will likely hurt consumers more than banks because Wall Street will find a way to get around it, banking analyst Richard Bove told CNBC.

  • U.S. Senator Bob Corker (R-TN)

    The compromise reached by negotiators on financial regfulation reform is far from perfect, Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and member of the Senate Banking Committee, told CNBC Friday.

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  • Plus, get Cramer’s latest on US financial reform.

  • Mark Fisher of MBF Asset Management thinks the energy sector is the place to be. He says it will be the ultimate currency.

  • The US will face a severe credit crunch if the financial regulation bill passes in its current form, Sen. Judd Gregg (R-NH) told CNBC Thursday.

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    The internal obsession with the stock must subside. It is a paranoid approach that is just as unnatural as the idea of Mr. Blankfein on Oprah.

  • Doctor holding test tube

    In today's world, the process of providing access to affordable healthcare should be easier than it is. Globally, we're all affected by the rising costs of healthcare in the face of an aging population – increasing expenditures for healthcare is a challenge in every country where Teva has a presence.

  • The US should expect a notable slowdown in GDP growth, to ½ percent, during the second half of this year, Jan Hatzius, chief US economist at Goldman Sachs, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    Senate negotiators are expected to offer changes today to the financial reform bill that would soften the Volcker rule. On Capitol Hill there is widespread speculation that the Senate negotiators will propose language that would allow banks to invest a small amount of their capital in their internal hedge funds or proprietary trading desks.