R&D All-Stars: The CNBC RQ 50

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  • Oshkosh Corporation chief engineer for Unmanned Systems, demonstrates a remote steering device for the TerraMax autonomous vehicle on a test course outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    Investors seeking steady gains on innovation should look past tech buzz. When R&D productivity is measured, 'boring' stocks often lead.

  • The CNBC RQ 50 identifies companies that don't just spend big on R&D, but spend right, creating return on innovation for shareholders.

  • Using the CNBC RQ 50 measure for R&D productivity, we've identified an elite group of companies that merit election to an R&D hall of fame.

  • CNBC launches its first RQ 50 list, a predictive tool to find stocks with a highly competitive R&D growth and innovation strategy.

  • CNBC's R&D All-Stars: AMD vs. Intel

    CNBC's Dominic Chu breaks down AMD and Intel to see which chip company is the most efficient allocator of research and developmental capital.

  • CNBC's R&D all-stars: Salix Pharmaceuticals and Vertex

    CNBC's Dominic Chu looks at how well Salix Pharmaceuticals and Vertex allocate spending on research and developmental capital.

  • CNBC's R&D all-stars: Lockheed Martin vs. Northrop Grumman

    CNBC's Dominic Chu looks at how well Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman allocate spending on research and developmental capital.

  • CNBC's R&D all-stars: Apple vs HP

    CNBC's Dominic Chu, breaks down Apple and Hewlett-Packard to see which company best optimizes R&D spending and creates the greatest shareholder value.

  • CNBC's R&D all-stars: Mattel vs. Hasbro

    CNBC's Dominic Chu breaks down Mattel and Hasbro to see which company is the most efficient allocator of research and developmental capital.

  • CNBC's R&D all-stars: DuPont vs. Dow Chemical

    CNBC's Dominic Chu, crunches the numbers to find out which company offers shareholders the greatest value.

About R&D All-Stars: The CNBC RQ 50

  • The CNBC RQ 50 is a unique list of publicly traded companies that derive the greatest shareholder value from their research and development spending (at a minimum of $100M annually), created in partnership with Washington University in St. Louis professor Anne Marie Knott, inventor of the Research Quotient (RQ). The RQ is calculated based on Professor Knott’s proprietary formula and is designed to help investors know what a company can expect to gain in revenue from an increase in R&D investment.

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