Business News Rudy Giuliani

  • Presidential Candidate, John McCain

    We have strong disagreements with all the Republicans running for president. The leading candidates have no plan for getting American troops out of Iraq. They are too wedded to discredited economic theories and unwilling even now to break with the legacy of President Bush. We disagree with them strongly on what makes a good Supreme Court justice.

  • Fed Cut and Mortgage

    The turmoil in the mortgage markets has incited a wave of legal tangles, as homeowners are suing lenders, lenders are suing banks, banks are suing loan specialists. And investors are suing everyone.

  • Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton won the vote in the Nevada Democratic caucuses on Saturday, giving her a second consecutive victory in what is shaping up as a protracted battle with Senator Barack Obama.

  • With his victory in South Carolina on Saturday, Senator John McCain of Arizona has accomplished what no other Republican presidential candidate has been able to do this year: he has captured two competitive contests. Not incidentally, this one was in the state that effectively sank his campaign in 2000.

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    Mitt Romney's big win in Michigan last night signals that both parties have wide-open 2008 nomination races--but for much different reasons. Republicans are dispirited and divided, about the merits of their candidates and also about hot-button issues such as immigration and abortion.

  • The convincing victory by Mitt Romney in the Michigan primary on Tuesday means three very different states — with dissimilar electorates driven by distinctive sets of priorities — have embraced three separate candidates in search of someone who can lead the party into a tough election and beyond President Bush.

  • STANDISH, Mich. — This quiet town, tucked between the thumb and the rest of the fingers in Michigan’s mitten, feels worlds away from the struggling automobile factories of Flint and Detroit. But economic gloom has made its way here just as it has seeped through so much of this state.

  • About a dozen senior campaign staffers for Rudy Giuliani are foregoing their January paychecks, aides said Friday, a sign of possible money trouble for the Republican presidential candidate.

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    This week, New Hampshire becomes the gateway to a new political world--engaging multiple constituencies, playing out over a vast terrain, shifting the psychology of competition. But as the 2008 campaign moves toward contests in Michigan, Nevada, South Carolina, Florida, then half the country on Feb. 5, the simplicity and careful planning of Iowa and New Hampshire phase give way to a complex, high-velocity game of survivor.

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    We have a new Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll that's shaking up the Republican presidential race, since Rudy Giuliani has lost his national lead. But it's also shaking up Ron Paul's legions of Internet supporters--because he fared so poorly at just 4 percent of the vote. Because his numbers were so low I didn't mention Paul in my Wall Street Journal story on the poll.

  • John McCain

    The longer the Republican presidential race goes on, the crazier it gets. John McCain suddenly has a mild breeze at his back--because Mike Huckabee has undercut Mitt Romney in Iowa, because of his lingering support at the scene of his 2000 New Hampshire triumph, because Democratic Senator Joe Lieberman has endorsed him, and because the Boston Globe has provided its seal of approval as well.

  • Iowa map

    Whatever happens in the Iowa caucuses, this year's contests have made plain that Republicans face a general election problem whoever the two parties' nominees are: an enthusiasm gap. Democratic campaigns expect that 125,000 or more Iowans will turn out for their caucuses on Jan 3. Republican campaign expect half that.

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    I can't help noticing the dramatic difference between the political and government parts of my beat these days--complete gridlock in Washington and turbulent action on the 2008 campaign trail. In the capital, Democrats and Republicans are fighting over literally everything--the budget, energy legislation, a fix for the out of control Alternative Minimum Tax.

  • Barack Obama

    A fresh round of polls has underscored the sense of flux in the 2008 presidential race--in both parties. A Washington Post-ABC News poll of Iowa Democrats shows a three-way race for the Jan 3 caucuses--but with Barack Obama, not Hillary Clinton, in the lead.

  • Before the campaign is done, the TV ads will run the full range from nutty to nasty and tens of millions of Americans will battleground states will see them. But for now, candidate commercials are largely confined to Iowa and New Hampshire television screens. And they are having an impact.

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    You know it's going to be a good debate when...the leading candidates start to accuse one another of lying BEFORE the debate. That's precisely what's happened in advance of tonight's Republican debate on CNN, featuring questions submitted via YouTube.

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    GOP debate results: Winner #1: former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. He displayed his trademark humor but also some grit, facing down Mitt Romney in defending his record on immigration. Huckabee is head and shoulders above the rest of the Republican field in communications skills, as he manages to convey a combination of conservative principles.

  • Republican Candidates

    Republican presidential rivals Rudy Giuliani and Mitt Romney scornfully debated immigration Wednesday in a provocative, no-holds-barred debate.

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    It's getting hot out there on the presidential 2008 trail as voting time draws closer. Here are a few things to remember as you watch the rhetorical and advertising bullets fly: 1. There's NOTHING wrong with drawing contrasts with an opponent--aka "going negative"--if there's a solid basis for it.

  • Those of who follow political campaigns often can't discern turning points until the campaigns are over. The 2008 contest may be no different. But just now there's a sense of ferment in both parties' presidential contests--and it's happening awfully close to the Jan 3 kickoff of the nomination process in Iowa.