Asia Top News and Analysis Singapore

  • A stockbroker watches his terminal during trading in Bombay, India, Thursday, May 18, 2006. Indian shares plunged Thursday, with the benchmark stock index tumbling 6.8 percent, or more than 800 points, its biggest point drop ever, largely on fears of higher taxes on foreign funds that invest in Indian stocks. (AP Photo/Rajesh Nirgude)

    Asian markets see-sawed in volatile trade Tuesday to end mixed as financial counters rebounded on news that Citigroup will receive a large cash infusion from the investment arm of the Abu Dhabi government. The news pushed the Japanese and South Korean markets back into the black after spending most of the session in negative territory.

  • Bank of China's shares slid as much as 9.4 percent on Tuesday after a key shareholder shed a $567 million stake amid market worries over the lender's exposure to the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis.

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    Asian markets surged to close firmly in the green Monday, with the exception of China's Shanghai Composite index, reversing four straight weeks of losses. Tokyo gained 1.6 percent, but South Korea came out tops with a whopping 4.7 percent advance.

  • Singapore's October inflation leapt 3.6 percent from a year ago to a 16-year high, reflecting higher costs for food and transport, data showed on Friday, putting pressure on the central bank to curb rising prices.

  • Singapore's state investor Temasek Holdings will adopt a three-pronged strategy to counter the rising tide of nationalism against sovereign wealth funds, a local newspaper said on Friday.

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    After a volatile trading session, Asian markets ended mostly lower as caution prevailed amid worries about the health of the U.S. economy -- the region's top export destination.

  • Dubai International Capital (DIC) plans to buy stakes in large Asian listed companies such as Singapore Telecommunications and DBS Group Holdings, a Singapore newspaper reported.

  • A man uses his mobile phone in front of electronic stock boards at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX Ltd.) headquarters in Sydney, Australia.

    Oil prices spiked to a record high just shy of $100 a barrel  lifting the shares of energy firms, but financial stocks sank Asian markets. Japan closed 2.4 percent lower whilst South Korea shed 3.5 percent.

  • Stock investors watch stock movement at a stock exchange in Chengdu, China.

    Trading proved volatile in the afternoon Asia session Tuesday with markets see-sawing and in out of the black.  Australia and South Korea ended lower, but a late turnaround pushed Japanese stocks out of the red with the Nikkei closing 1.1 percent higher.

  • Shares of Indonesia's two biggest telephone stocks tumbled at the start of trade on Tuesday following a ruling by the country's anti-monopoly agency, and dragging down the Jakarta stock index

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    Asian markets closed mostly lower Monday with investors selling stocks on U.S. economic concerns amid a lack of market-moving factors. Japan and South Korea both finished lower after initial gains during the morning session.

  • Indonesia is set to rule on Monday on a probe into Temasek Holdings' business practices in the nation's mobile phone sector, which could see the Singapore state investment arm being fined or forced to reduce its holdings in the sector.

  • Singapore's economy grew at an annualized, seasonally adjusted rate of 4.3 percent in the third quarter, well below market expectations for 6.4 percent, as a series of government cooling measures and the impact of the subprime crisis took hold. 

  • Asian markets closed sharply down Friday, amid renewed worries about the health of the U.S. economy and the effects of the credit crunch on the broader global economy. Japan, South Korea and Australia all declined.

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    Asian markets closed lower Thursday, with investors selling ahead of key U.S. October consumer inflation data due later today. Japan, South Korea and Australia all finished lower despite trading higher throughout most of the session.

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    Asian markets rebounded after four straight sessions of losses, with some markets climbing nearly 5 percent as investors picked up financials and other battered stocks.

  • Asian markets closed mixed Tuesday, with Japan ending weaker for an eight consecutive session. But South Korea and Australia managed to eke out gains after weaving in and out of negative territory throughout the day.

  • Stock investors watch stock movement at a stock exchange in Chengdu, China.

    Asian markets closed sharply down Monday, with investors dumping stocks and seeking safer bets after more evidence that U.S. subprime-mortgage related woes continue to feed into the global banking sector and economy. Japan and South Korea closed sharply lower, with today's losses wiping out all of the Nikkei's gains for 2007.

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    Asian markets closed mixed, with stocks under pressure as the U.S. dollar slumped to a record low against the euro in the afternoon session Friday. Japan shed over 1 percent but South Korea and Australia both finished higher.

  • Australian infrastructure firm SP Ausnet plans to raise about $2.7 billion in an institutional share placement to help fund its purchase of $7.7 billion of assets from energy firm Alinta.