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The New Entrepreneurs

  • The World's Most Promising New Companies

    Startup Open, a competition that searches for startups with the greatest growth potential, chose 50 companies to compete for the opportunity to present their business plans to experienced entrepreneurs, and gain insight from the experts.  Here is a sampling of the 50 , representing a range of ideas from around the world.

Commentary

  • By: Brad Feld | Managing director of Foundry Group and co-founder of TechStars

    We are shifting into a network society that is a product of the post-information era. Startups, and entrepreneurs, are at the core of this reinvention of the way we work and live.

  • By: Linda Rottenberg | Co-founder and CEO, Endeavor

    Recently, Bono admitted to  “humbling” realizations about foreign aid:   “job creators and innovators are ... the key, and aid is just a bridge.” It’s no secret: the world needs jobs.

  • By: Karen Mills | Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration

    A successful microeconomic strategy draws on a region’s unique strengths, then integrates the value chain to create ecosystems of entrepreneurship that support innovation and new business formation.

  • By: Sean Griffin | CEO and Founder, StartUp Cup

    An entrepreneurial ecosystem has sprouted in what some would say is a most unexpected community. It has all the elements of a large city effort, including support for technology startups as well as the 98 percent of startups that are not technology-based.

  • By: Pedro Arboleda | Partner at Monitor Group

    Imagine a place where high-impact entrepreneurs are so pleased that they don’t complain. Would those be entrepreneurs living in Silicon Valley perhaps? Not so.

  • By: Jonathan Ortmans | President, Global Entrepreneurship Week

    Some 88 million young women and men worldwide are unemployed — 47 percent of the unemployed globally. Economic leaders have been stumped as to what to do about it. Now Generation Y is taking matters into its own hands.

  • By: Vala Hallsdorsdottir and Sesselja Vilhjalmsdottir

    Shortly after the Icelandic economy crashed in 2008, we founded our first company. Call us crazy, but in the midst of thousands losing their jobs and the first en masse public protest against the government since Iceland’s induction into NATO in 1949, we decided to start a board game company. It was a blast.

Features

  • The Immigrant Exodus: Will the US Run Out of Entrepreneurs?

    Foreign-born entrepreneurs, who traditionally moved to the U.S. to start companies, are now opting to return home, in large part because of difficulties getting a work visa.

  • 11 Entrepreneurs Teaching the Next Generation

    Many long-time serial entrepreneurs are today's angel investors and venture capitalists — and the classroom gives them an early glimpse at the potential next big names in emerging fields. Here are 11 notable entrepreneurs who have taken to the classroom.

  • A Tech Apprenticeship to Rival Peter Thiel's?

    A new apprenticeship program called [E]nstitute pairs 11 students — who live together in a loft near Wall Street — with New York’s top technology entrepreneurs for  two years, then launches them into the startup world.

  • Surprising Cities Where New Businesses Are Built
    By: Jennifer Parker | Special to CNBC.com

    While Silicon Valley and other traditional high-tech hubs claim dominance as places for startups, demand for health care  and other business services has put places like Indianapolis and Salt Lake City on the entrepreneurial map.

  • The Baby Boomer Entrepreneur

    Tech startup founders in their 20s and 30s make all the headlines, but when it comes to entrepreneurship, increasingly it’s baby boomers who are more likely to be in business for themselves.

  • What's the Worth of an Ivy League Education?

    A college degree is by no means the only determining factor for a tech startup's success, but it turns out that it does make a difference.

  • Not Everyone Launches a Startup in the Bay Area
    By: Samuel Arbesman | Senior Scholar, Kauffman Foundation

    The chronicle of where people choose to start companies as compared to where they come from is far more complex and much more interesting than you might imagine.

  • The Boomer Entrepreneur: Never Too Old to Launch a Business
    By: by Alana Muller | President, Kauffman FastTrac

    With people feeling healthier and living longer, coupled with a down economy that has reduced retirement savings, many Americans of traditional retirement age are choosing to continue working or even go back to work — for themselves.

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