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Our government is 'too big to succeed'

What is most important for America and the next president? For me, the answer is obvious — we have lacked leadership in both parties, and because of this leadership deficit, the American people live in a nation less safe and in a world that is more uncertain. Americans deserve real leadership in the White House, and the choices Americans have in this presidential campaign are clear.

What passes for leadership in Washington is really more about position, seniority and the influences of special interests than it is about achieving goals, meeting mission requirements or serving the people. Most elected officials in Washington have little in the way of leadership skills. Rather, most have been career politicians who have focused on self-interest rather than the interests of their constituents or American citizens. It's time for a change.

Donald Trump
Scott Morgan | Reuters
Donald Trump

Real leadership is about competence. Take a look at any government program. I defy anyone to identify a single program that is successful and without fraud or waste. Take a look at the Iran nuclear deal. Take a look at how we are dealing with things in the Middle East. Take a look at how we are handling things on our southern border, in Syria or in Ukraine. Our government is "too big to succeed" so we need to find ways to better manage the people's resources and the best way of doing that is bringing to Washington the best leaders we can find. I have a record of attracting the best and the brightest to my organization and I would continue to bring that talent to serve the people.

Real leadership is about selflessness. Sure, I am what I am, but when it comes to accomplishing the goals of my organization, I put the interests of my employees and the company ahead of everything else. A person who seeks public office must do the same. Special interests have corrupted — and will continue to corrupt — our national government. Take a look at the incumbency rate of members of Congress. Take a look at where their campaign contributions come from. Is it any wonder that they end up voting the way they do? The only special interest not represented in Washington is that of the American people. I will come to Washington without anyone having a hold on me. And the people who will come with me will be the same.

Real leadership is about decisiveness. When a leader has been able to gather all the available information, focuses his or her attention on the goals of the organization and then aligns actions to achieve those goals, decisions are easy to make. When a person dithers, wavers or seeks the consent of the polls before acting,that person is failing the people who sent him or her to Washington. Political expedience and fear of losing special interest contributions are poor companions. Real leaders decide. Politicians seek haven in orchestrated performances that are meaningless at best and destructive of public confidence at worst.

Real leadership is about courage. Many times in my life I have had to make the really tough decisions that meant meeting payroll, completing a project or simply taking care of the people who depended on me to do my best. Many times, leaders stand alone and have to face those tough choices. The best leaders are able to make hard decisions and then stand by the outcomes and consequences. How long has it been since we have seen that in Washington? Leading from behind is far short of real leadership. Real leaders stand in front of the people, tell them the truth and then do what is best for the nation. That's real leadership.

People in America have a lot of hard choices to make with a big Republican field full of politicians. When it comes to leadership, however, there is only one clear choice. Join with me to "Make America Great Again."

Commentary by Donald Trump, CEO of Trump Organization and a 2016 Republican candidate for president of the United States. The real-estate mogul was also the host of the reality-television show, "The Apprentice." Follow him on Twitter @realDonaldTrump.

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