GoPro CEO's new toy: A 180-foot yacht

GoPro founder Nick Woodman likes to tell the story of how the first GoPro camera was inspired by a surfing trip. Now, the billionaire CEO is upgrading his water toys to include a megayacht.

According to people familiar with the matter, Woodman has ordered a 180-foot yacht from Dutch yacht-builder Amels. The boat, expected to be delivered in 2017, is four decks high and comes with a Jacuzzi pool, swim platform, sweeping sun decks and dining areas.

It's unclear exactly how much Woodman is paying for the boat. But a typical 180-foot Amels yacht sells for $35 million to $40 million. The yachtmaker declined comment, citing its strict client confidentiality policy. Woodman also declined comment.

Amels' 180-foot boat is the perfect starter megayacht. With space for 14 guests and a typical crew of about 12 or 13, it's ideal for cruising around the Caribbean or Mediterranean, with a range of 4,500 nautical miles cruising at 13 knots.

The boat's "beach club" area on the aft deck has room for plenty of GoPro-friendly water toys, including Jet Skis and underwater scooters. It also has a "touch-and-go" helipad for landing a chopper aboard.

Typically, a 180-foot boat like this would cost around $3 million to $4 million a year to run, including crew, fuel, maintenance and docking fees, according to yachting experts.

An example of the Amels 180 yacht
An example of the Amels 180 yacht

Amels is regarded as one of the top three yacht builders in the world, alongside Lurssen and Feadship. Its 180-foot series is its smallest and most popular yacht, but it's also working on a 272-footer to be delivered next year.

Woodman's boat was ordered earlier this year; but since these yachts take two years to build, it won't be delivered until 2017, according to people close to the situation.

A spokesman for Amels said the company currently has 10 boats of various sizes under construction.

It's a good time for U.S.-based buyers to shop the yacht market, thanks to the stronger dollar. A yacht priced at 30 million euros, for instance, would have cost a U.S. buyer $41.5 million last summer; now, it costs around $33 million, marking a savings of $8.5 million.