Apple lacks innovation, it copies: Expert

No major advancements for Apple: Contributor
No major advancements for Apple: Contributor   

Apple Inc. is reportedly venturing into original TV by releasing its first nonscripted series about apps, but this proves that the company thrives off of existing ideas, scholar Vivek Wadhwa contended on CNBC Thursday.

"There's no real world shocking innovation happening anymore from Apple," the fellow at Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University, told "Closing Bell." "It was nine years ago that the iPhone came out ... since then it's been giving us bigger screens and smaller screens ... and we go along," he noted, before adding that Apple's series imitates Netflix.

In contrast, Apple founder Steve Jobs was known for creating a market rather than satisfying market demands, a quality that Wadhwa considers to have slipped through Apple's fingers. While the inventor has been credited with creating the blueprint for mobile breakthroughs, the expert argues new technology will soon overshadow mobile.

"Mark Zuckerberg figured that out; he bought Oculus [VR] for $2 billion and he's put massive resource into it," he said, adding that while the technology will be flawed when it's released, public feedback will be a catalyst for virtual reality's advance.

The Facebook founder's strategy is notably different from Apple's "perfectionist" reputation, an approach that Apple should forgo given that other companies are rushing out products, Wadhwa said.

"Three or four years from now it'll be amazing, and Facebook will be the leader of virtual reality," he said. "Apple will still be sitting there testing the technology it's barely been working on for the last seven years."

The race for the technology that recreates environments and emulates sensory experiences is not only run by Facebook, other companies such as Samsung and Google have joined the race.

Conversely, Wadhwa said Thursday that "every big thing that Apple has released of late has been a copy."

Apple did not immediately respond to CNBC's request for a response.