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Trump plans executive orders to scale back EPA's climate change work, Beltway newsletter reports

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President Donald Trump plans to introduce executive actions aimed at scaling back Obama-era climate change initiatives, according to the newsletter Inside EPA.

The president intends to sign the actions during a visit to the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters for Scott Pruitt's swearing in as head of the agency, Inside EPA reported Tuesday, citing an administration source. The timing of the event has not been determined because the full Senate has not yet confirmed Pruitt.

The Hill reported on the Inside EPA report on Wednesday. The White House did not immediately return CNBC's request for comment.

The source did not share the contents of the executive actions, but told Inside EPA they would "suck the air out" of the room.

The event would be similar to Trump's Pentagon visit for the swearing in of retired Gen. James Mattis as Defense secretary, during which he signed executive orders restricting immigration from seven majority Muslim nations and admittance of refugees, the source said.

Myron Ebell, who directed EPA staffing for the Trump transition team, told Inside EPA in a Feb. 7 interview he expected a roll-back of the EPA's climate change programs to be delivered in one or more executive orders.

The executive orders could repeal former President Barack Obama's Climate Action Plan, a framework for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the Clean Power Plan, which regulates carbon emissions from power plants, Inside EPA reported.

The source said one of the planned executive actions will be directed at the State Department. Inside EPA said that suggests it may relate to the Paris Agreement, an international accord to reduce the impact of climate change, which Trump has threatened to abandon or defund.

The Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works moved forward Pruitt's confirmation earlier this month despite a boycott by Democratic members.

Pruitt drew national attention for suing the EPA over Obama-era regulations while serving as Oklahoma's attorney general. He has questioned the science behind climate change and advocates for giving states greater control over energy industry regulation.