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There’s no cheap date in Zurich, Deutsche Bank tells us

Shoppers look at 'lucky bags' containing luxury watches displayed outside a store on January 1, 2016 in Tokyo, Japan.
Tomohiro Ohsumi | Getty Images
Shoppers look at 'lucky bags' containing luxury watches displayed outside a store on January 1, 2016 in Tokyo, Japan.

There's no cheap date in Zurich, running costs an arm and a leg in Copenhagen and sinning runs a pretty penny in Oslo.

And if that gets you down, move to Wellington, New Zealand, for the best quality of life.

That's according to Deutsche Bank's annual survey of prices across 47 cities globally, released Wednesday, ranking everything from a cheap date to renting an average two-bedroom apartment to creating a quality-of-life index.

When it comes to courtship, Zurich will put the biggest dent in your wallet, the survey found.

A cheap date – defined as cab rides, dinner or lunch for two at a pub or diner, soft drinks, two movie tickets and a couple of beers – runs about $195.90 in Zurich, down around 7 percent from last year, the survey found.

"Our advice to those in Zurich is either to marry young or choose your blind dates carefully," the report said.

The Swiss city was followed by Norway's Oslo, Japan's Tokyo, Denmark's Copenhagen and Sweden's Stockholm as the top-five most expensive cheap dates.

"These five cities are also the most expensive for a haircut so the pre-date investment costs are also high," Deutsche Bank said.

For the cheapest of the cheap dates, travel to Asia, where the Philippines' Manila, Indonesia's Jakarta, Malaysia's Kuala Lumpur and two Indian cities, New Delhi and Bangalore, are at the bottom of the price index.

"If you're young, free and single in Zurich, depending on how much you date it might be profitable to migrate to parts of Asia even after the salary sacrifice," the report said.

If you want to take your date away for the weekend, Italy's Milan might break the bank, costing around $2,092, the survey found.

That's for two nights in a standard five-star hotel room, two pub meals for two, two restaurant dinners for two, car rentals for two days, two pints of beer, four liters of soft drinks or water and some shopping: a pair of jeans and sports shoes.

Oslo isn't just expensive for dating: So is being unhealthy. Norway's capital tops the "bad habits index," a package defined as five beers and two packs of cigarettes.

Melbourne and Sydney in Australia, Auckland in New Zealand and Singapore round out the top-five most expensive spots for bad habits, while South Africa's Johannesburg ,the Czech Republic's Prague and Manila are the cheapest spots.

Being healthy can also be expensive, with Copenhagen coming in as the most expensive place to buy sports shoes from Nike, Adidas, or an equivalent brand, averaging at $131.30, as much as 147 percent more expensive than in New York, the survey found.

But when it comes to the place to settle down, Deutsche Bank pointed to Wellington in New Zealand at the top of the quality-of-life index, based on eight variables: purchasing power, safety, healthcare, cost of living, house price-to-income, commuting time, pollution and climate.

"This is all highly subjective and one person's long commute may be another person's chance to catch-up on Netflix or DB research," the report noted.

Indeed, Singapore dropped 26 places in the index from last year, to 29, despite its safety scoring best on a disdain for the tropical climate as well as a high cost of living and a poor property-to-income ratio.

Other cities in the top five included the U.K.'s Edinburgh, Austria's Vienna, Australia's Melbourne and Zurich.

At the other end of the spectrum, Manila ranked worst of the 47 cities, followed by Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, India's Mumbai, Jakarta and Brazil's Rio de Janeiro.

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Correction: Bern is the capital of Switzerland. An earlier version misstated this fact.