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FBI’s Mueller reportedly seeking interviews with intelligence officials, pointing to Trump probe

  • Robert Mueller, the FBI special counsel investigating Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election, is seeking interviews with three high-ranking foreign intelligence names, the New York Times reported, citing a person briefed on the investigation
  • Mueller's actions suggested a probe of whether Trump committed obstruction of justice was in the works, the report said

Robert Mueller, the special counsel investigating Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election, is seeking interviews with three high-ranking foreign intelligence names, suggesting a probe of U.S. President Donald Trump's actions, the New York Times reported, citing a person briefed on the investigation.

Mueller was seeking to question Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, head of the National Security Agency Michael Rogers and former NSA deputy director Richard Ledgett, the report said.

While none were involved with Trump's campaign, where much of the Russia investigation had appeared to be focused, recent media reports indicated Trump may have requested their help to try to get former FBI Director James Comey to end the probe of Trump's fired national security adviser Michael Flynn, the report noted.

The Washington Post reported on Wednesday that Mueller's investigation was looking into whether Trump attempted to obstruct justice after the president fired Comey and said in a mid-May television interview that it was due to the Russia investigation.

The New York Times report cited a former senior official as saying that Mueller's investigation was looking at potential money-laundering by Trump associates on suspicion that any cooperation with Russian officials was most likely in exchange for a financial payoff, with potential efforts to hide those via offshore banking centers.

The White House press office, Trump's personal attorney, Marc Kasowitz and Mueller's office didn't immediately respond to CNBC's emailed requests for comment, which were sent outside of office hours.

The full New York Times article can be read here.

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