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  • Lehman Brothers

    Lehman Brothers may have collapsed a year and a half ago, but fallout from its demise has created a potential legal liability for its former accounting firm, Ernst & Young.

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    Couples must learn how to deal with their debt, or they may not last long. How much do you know about the effect of debt on marriages?

  • Lawyers for billionaires Donald Trump and Carl Icahn are in court playing a real-life version of Monopoly over who should control some prized Atlantic City property.

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    "The problem is substantial," says Bob Walters, chief economist at Quicken Loans. "We are talking about it more in the industry and it's becoming more accepted among homeowners."

  • Lithuania

    As financial markets panic about the risks to the euro from laxer governments in southern Europe, the northern Baltic states are already in tight fiscal bandages as they experience Europe's most severe recession.

  • Tonight, we learn about Mr. Paulson's thinking behind all those decisions, taken in response to the financial crisis, and, ultimately, in the pursuit of long-run American prosperity.

  • More than a year after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson admitted that saying the bank would not get a bailout, was a ploy in the negotiations over the failed institution.

  • This Monday, Henry Paulson will be on CNBC as Larry's guest. The former head of the Treasury is coming on CNBC to talk with Larry about his new book and his role in the bailouts and AIG.

  • New York City

    The financially troubled owners of two massive apartment complexes that sold for a record $5.4 billion a few years ago said Monday they're turning them over to their creditors.

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    The chief executive of cable operator Charter Communications is joining larger rival Comcast as president of its cable operations.

  • As Japan Airlines, Asia's behemoth airline, flies closer to bankruptcy we’re learning more and more about the man tasked with leading the company during the restructuring. He's the author of “A Compass to Fulfillment: Passion and Spirituality in Life and Business,” a national best seller.

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    In a moment of brilliance, Congress, in 1978, recognized that, in business, failure is not only an option, but the inevitable outcome of economic growth. Why is this?

  • broke

    U.S. consumers and businesses are filing for bankruptcy at a pace that made 2009 the seventh-worst year on record, with more than 1.4 million petitions submitted, an Associated Press tally showed Monday.

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    That this year has been a tough one for small business is no surprise. But just how tough it has been continues to astound. The New York Times looks at seven businesses that failed this year.

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    Bank holding company Washington Mutual has asked a federal court for the power to make the Federal Reserve, the U.S. Treasury, and a long list of other parties turn over documents and witness interviews related to the bank's 2008 collapse.

  • Carl Icahn

    Billionaire investor Carl C. Icahn said Friday he has agreed to buy a majority of the first-lien bank debt of Trump Entertainment Resorts, which owns three resorts in Atlantic City, N.J.

  • Financial Crisis

    The government's $700 billion bailout of the financial system helped prevent an all-out panic last fall but hasn't met many of the targets Congress set out, a watchdog panel says.

  • Jon Lauckner, General Motors' Vice President of Global Product Planning, speaks at the Detroit Hamtramck Assembly Plant. GM announced that they will invest $336 million to build the new Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicle at the plant.

    Edward E. Whitacre Jr., the new chief executive of General Motors, has one big advantage as he tries to turn around the automaker — a stockpile of cash to develop new cars and trucks.

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    Big banks are roaring back. At crisis' edge last year, they are repaying billions of dollars dumped into their vaults to rescue them. Dividend checks are accumulating at the Treasury. Taxpayers won't recoup the full sum of the government's unprecedented infusion to the financial sector, but the returns are ahead of schedule.