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The Fed Ben Bernanke

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    The Federal Reserve slashed a key U.S. interest rate by three-quarters of a point, to 2.25%, but Wall Street didn't seem to care that the cut was smaller than many had expected.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.
  • Stocks soared Tuesday, led by financials, as the market breathed a huge sigh of relief following better-than-expected earnings from Goldman Sachs and Lehman Brothers.

  • Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke

    Fed policy-makers are expected to make the biggest interest rate cut since 1982, while two major Wall Street firms provided some relief to investors with better-than-expected earnings.

  • Stocks opened higher Tuesday as investors are anticipating that the Federal Reserve will deliver an unusually large rate cut.

  • Credit Crunch

    As the credit crunch worsens,  the Federal Reserve is becoming  more imaginative in its tactics. Wall Street is now betting on a full-point cut in interest rates, to  2%,  when the Fed meets Tuesday.

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    The flagging U.S. economy got more mixed news from its troubled housing sector on Tuesday, while evidence of inflation pressures continued to lurk in the producer pipeline.

  • Did the Fed avert a crisis Monday or did it just delay the inevitable sell-off?

  • Bear Stearns' second largest shareholder, Joe Lewis, said Monday JPMorgan's $2 a share offer for the investment bank is "derisory."

  • Lehman shares tumbled more than 20 percent Monday as Wall Street speculated whether or not it's the ailing banking system's next casualty.

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    Stocks were lower in early trading Monday as Wall Street digested the fire-sale buyout of an investment banking giant: Bear Stearns. CNBC brought the market pros for their perspective on the fallout.

  • Credit Crunch

    A fire sale of Bear Stearns stunned Wall Street and pummeled global financial stocks on Monday on fears that few banks are safe from deepening market turmoil.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Federal Reserve announced emergency measures to stem a fast-spreading global financial crisis, tapping tools last used in the Great Depression to pour funds into cash-starved Wall Street firms.

  • With the FOMC meeting scheduled for Tuesday can you get ahead of the Fed?

  • Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke delivers the board's Monetary Policy Report to the Senate Banking Committee in Washington Wednesday, July 19, 2006. "The recent rise in inflation is of concern," and possible increases in the prices of oil as well as other raw materials "remain a risk to the inflation outlook," Bernanke said. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke  is throwing all he’s got at the economy, but it may not be enough to combat both a recession and credit crunch.

  • President Bush, right, makes remarks during the re-dedication ceremony of the Islamic Center of Washington in Washington, Wednesday, June 27, 2007. Center Director Dr. Abdullah Khouj is at left. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    President Bush, on a drive to bolster faith in the U.S. economy amid fears of a recession, said Friday the economy was resilient and would regain its strength despite the hard times.

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    A mortgage bailout plan hatched between Wall Street and Congress is gaining political traction even though it could be on a crash-course with the Bush administration.

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    Subprime mortgage write-downs could reach $285 billion, but an end to the write-downs is  in sight for big financial firms, S&P said.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    This week's central bank efforts to unfreeze credit markets will offer only temporary relief and more pain can be expected before a market recovery, analysts said.

  • U.S. stock index futures pointed to a broadly flat open for Wall Street Wednesday, following the previous session's huge rally, as investor enthusiasm at the prospect of more liquidity and looser collateral rules by the Federal Reserve started to dwindle.