Diana Olick

Diana Olick

Diana Olick
CNBC Real Estate Reporter

Diana Olick is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, currently serving as CNBC's real estate correspondent as well as the author of the Realty Check section on CNBC.com, which won the Gracie Award for "Outstanding Blog" in 2015. She also contributes her real estate expertise to NBC's "Today" and "NBC Nightly News."

Prior to joining CNBC in 2002, Olick spent seven years as a correspondent for CBS News.

Olick began her career as a local news reporter at WABI-TV in Bangor, Maine; WZZM-TV in Grand Rapids, Mich.; and KIRO-TV in Seattle. She joined CBS in 1994 as a New York-based correspondent for the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and "The Early Show." She also contributed pieces to "48 Hours" and "Sunday Morning." During that time, she covered such stories as the World Trade Center conspiracy trial and the Boston abortion clinic shooting.

In 1995, Olick was assigned to cover the Midwest as a Dallas bureau correspondent. In the three years she was there, she covered all forms of natural disaster, including the crash of TWA Flight 800, the JonBenet Ramsey murder mystery and was the exclusive correspondent for the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Terry Nichols. During that time, she also took a temporary assignment in CBS' Moscow bureau, where she chronicled the brief presidential campaign of Mikhail Gorbachev.

In 1998, Olick was reassigned to the New York bureau and then immediately posted to Bahrain for the buildup to a possible second Gulf War. A year later, she went to Albania to cover the U.S. military buildup during the conflict in Kosovo.

Upon her return, Olick was reassigned to CBS' Washington bureau and the Capitol Hill beat. During Campaign 2000, Olick covered the Senate campaign of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and later joined the Bush campaign as a special correspondent for "The Early Show." That fall, she was named Supreme Court correspondent; her first case was Bush v. Gore.

Olick has a B.A. in comparative literature with a minor in soviet studies from Columbia College in New York and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

Follow Diana Olick on Twitter @Diana_olick.

More

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    The deadline for ending temporarily higher loan limits at Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the FHA is October 1st, but they are effectively ended now. A Wells Fargo spokesman confirms, "August 15th was the deadline for applications and rate locks for FHA and conventional conforming loans with balances above the limits we expect will be in place after September 30th."

  • Drywall

    Builders are on track to construct the fewest single family homes in history this year. Total housing starts in July were down 1.7 percent, month to month, which may not sound like a lot, but when you break the number down, you see the problem.

  • Nantucket

    What shut these so-called "hedge fund wives" wallets was not lack of cash but lack of confidence, and that is the same sentiment keeping potential home buyers out of the market today.

  • foreclosure_chained_200.jpg

    Just as we saw a double dip in home prices, we may be seeing another surge in foreclosures.

  • couple_looking_at_house_200.jpg

    I realize everyone is glued to the stock ticker today, watching their personal net worth fall yet again; I know this because every time I wired up to do a live shot on CNBC today, my "hit" was "killed" at the last minute because the Dow dropped again. But it is precisely on days like this that we have to focus on how it all affects housing; stocks may fill our 401K's, but our homes are (or were) our single greatest investment.

  • signing_loans.jpg

    The one positive in all the uncertainty surrounding the nation's debt was a plunge in Treasury yields, which in turn sent mortgage rates to record lows. So are we housing geeks now jumping for joy? All good? Maybe not so much.

  • vacation_home_sale_200.jpg

    The chief economist at the National Association of Realtors said he was baffled by it, but ask any agent working the nation's neighborhoods, and they'll tell you it is all about confidence and financing—specifically, a lack of both.

  • foreclosure_chained_200.jpg

    A new study found, "foreclosed homes go through more than a year of very high vacancy rates following the auction and are substantially more likely to be vacant up to 60 months after the foreclosure." 

  • home loans

    As we edge ever closer to next Tuesday, August 2nd, those of us who cover the housing market are trying to figure out what this will mean to mortgage interest rates. They are currently bouncing around historic lows and have been for some time. Refinances are surging, as the seven people left who haven't yet refied are scrambling to do so. But are we all worried over nothing?

  • home_calculator.jpg

    It's not like the housing market needs any more headwinds, so here's the government potentially giving us another: The mortgage interest deduction is back in big play in the budget deal.