×

Business Egypt

  • Oil Shock

    Discussing who is right in Libya and whether a Gaddafi comeback would be bad for oil, with Michael Levi, Fellow for Science and Technology, Council on Foreign Relations and Helima Croft, Barclay's geopolitical analyst.

  • Hollywood sign

    Things have gotten chilly here for Natural Selection, the film production company backed by Col. Muammar el-Gaddafi’s son Saadi, the New York Times reports.

  • Throughout the recent unrest in the Middle East, virtually no oil production has been affected, save in Libya, Sara Akbar, CEO of Kuwait Energy, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • A youth with an Egyptian flag painted on his face stands in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.

    An Egyptian businessman warns against mob rule.

  • The Secret Oil Dividend

    A trade to capture a healthy dividend off the rising price of crude.

  • Mortgage application

    You probably don't think of unrest in the far away Middle East as having anything to do with the housing market here in the U.S. You should. The weekly mortgage applications say it all.

  • Commodities Tomorrow: Oil & Gold Soar

    Electronic trading and geopolitical risks drive commodities prices higher. CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses oil and gold's new highs, as silver hits its highest price in 31 years.

  • Protests in Libya

    The Goldman Sachs executive who coined the term “BRIC” for the emerging economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China says that a post-revolution Middle East and North Africa could rival that economic group one day.

  • Protests in Libya

    Forget Twitter and Facebook. Forget outspoken Google spacer Exec Wael Ghonim. If you want to know who should get credit for the sudden surge towards democracy in the Middle East, send a ‘Thank You’ note to Ben Bernanke.

  • saudi_oil_200.jpg

    If Saudi raised oil production to 9 million barrels per day, then they've chosen a good time to do it.

  • saudi_oil_200.jpg

    Good King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia figures that $36 billion will buy off any potential unrest in his realm of Saudi Arabia. That's an expensive piece of cake he's dishing up.

  • Protests in Libya

    World leaders condemned Muammar Gaddafi's bloody crackdown on a revolt that has split Libya, but took little action to halt the bloodshed from the latest upheaval reshaping the Arab world.

  • Protesters run from a cloud of teargas during a clash with Bahraini security forces near the Pearl roundabout in Manama, Bahrain. Protesters said that the army fired on them with live rounds, followed by teargas which drove the demonstrators back. There are unconfirmed reports that there are four dead in the clashes.

    The mass protests in Bahrain will make the country stronger and not lead to the fall of the ruling royal family, the boss of Bahrain's sovereign wealth fund has told CNBC.

  • As the retail sales numbers go tomorrow, so will go the dollar.

  • Hurting in the Middle Eastern sense means being shot. Watch the armies. If, as in Egypt, they refuse to fire on the people, the leader is toast.

  • President Barack Obama News Conference

    The administration is searching for an acceptable blend of government support and a pro business environment because voters demand better jobs without compromising the nation’s balance sheet. The answer may be in Tripoli.

  • A youth with an Egyptian flag painted on his face stands in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.

    The global financial markets are beginning to show signs of distress and volatility after an exceptional strong rally in US equities and global risk.

  • Supporters of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi hold his pictures as they take part in a pro-government rally in Tripoli on February 17, 2011 as the country faced a nationwide "Day of Anger" called by opposition cyber activists.

    Fears that Libya is heading toward deepening chaos hit stocks Monday and pushed oil prices sharply higher.

  • Supporters of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi hold his pictures as they take part in a pro-government rally in Tripoli on February 17, 2011 as the country faced a nationwide "Day of Anger" called by opposition cyber activists.

    Clashes in oil producer Libya sent benchmark Brent crude to 2-1/2-year highs on Monday above $105 a barrel on fears that supplies to Western countries could be disrupted, while U.S. prices rallied by more than $4.

  • China_marching_200.jpg

    Jittery Chinese authorities wary of any domestic dissent staged a show of force Sunday to squelch a mysterious online call for a "Jasmine Revolution," with only a handful of people joining protests apparently modeled on the pro-democracy demonstrations sweeping the Middle East.