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  • Market Shock: Analysts Cite Yen, Naive Investors Friday, 2 Mar 2007 | 2:35 PM ET
    Klaus Regling, chief executive officer of the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF)

    Many of those seeking reasons for Tuesday's market meltdown have turned from China to Japan. Two forex experts told CNBC's Liz Claman why the global shock may have more to do with Tokyo than Shanghai -- or New York.

  • Hormats: Markets "Way Overreacted" to China's Selloff Wednesday, 28 Feb 2007 | 3:10 PM ET

    As Tuesday's market meltdown shows, China has to walk a fine line when it tries to reign in its surging economy. A suggestion by China's government that it might curb excessive speculation in stocks triggered an 8.8% plunge in the Shanghai Composite Index and set the stage for a global market selloff.

  • Today's Agenda in the Markets Wednesday, 28 Feb 2007 | 8:46 AM ET

    U.S. stocks are setting up a relief rally this morning after yesterday's high velocity selloff. World stock markets continue to spin lower, starting with Asia last night where most markets suffered losses. The exception was the market that started it all, China's Shanghai stock market, which recovered more than a third of Tuesday's losses.

  • China Makes A Market Tuesday, 27 Feb 2007 | 2:00 PM ET

    Government efforts to cool China's stock market may rattle global investors for a day now and then but they may help in the long run.

  • A Fund Manager that tries What he Buys... Tuesday, 27 Feb 2007 | 8:54 AM ET

    Andy Brough, Fund Manager at Schroders, doesn’t need my support, but I’ll offer it anyhow. Nice to have a money manager on the programme who makes a point of trying what he is buying.

  • Best Buy plans to open about 130 stores in the United States, Canada and China during its fiscal year beginning March 4, the company said today.

  • China Predicts Slower GDP Growth in First Half Monday, 12 Feb 2007 | 9:41 PM ET

    A top Chinese government research institute forecast on Tuesday that gross domestic product growth would slow moderately in the first half of this year while inflation would rise.

  • Micron

    Falling oil and weaker global markets are the backdrop for a likely lower opening in U.S. stocks this morning. Saudi Arabia's oil minister Ali Naimi knocked the wind out of oil prices early today. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Naimi said he was satisfied with market conditions and that OPEC may not need to change output.

  • China's January Trade Surplus Hits $15.88 Billion Monday, 12 Feb 2007 | 12:26 AM ET

    China posted a chunky trade surplus for January of $15.88 billion, propelling the rolling 12-month total to a record high.

  • Correction Around the Corner? Friday, 9 Feb 2007 | 4:06 AM ET

    "If the market's going up, why am I so worried?" That sounds like a question from a self-help group. It encapsulates a lot of the viewer feedback we are receiving on "Squaw Box" at the moment.

  • U.S. Pressing China on Flexible Yuan, Paulson Says Thursday, 8 Feb 2007 | 1:30 PM ET

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson told lawmakers that the U.S. is seeking benchmarks for actions to open China's economy to more U.S. goods and services.

  • China Invests In Africa--But For What Returns? Thursday, 8 Feb 2007 | 1:28 PM ET

    African nations like Sierra Leone and Namibia might not seem like they would be the first place investors looked to put their money. But they are exactly where China has been investing heavily over the past couple of years. And that raised the question--why is the world’s most populous nation pouring money into the world’s poorest continent?

  • The Bush administration on Friday filed a complaint with the World Trade Organization, accusing China of improperly subsidizing its own firms. "Power Lunch" heard from two experts on international trade, who debated whether the filing was smart, hard-edged economic brinkmanship -- or a savvy political move to mollify Congressional Democrats and others who demand White House action on vanishing U.S. manufacturing jobs.

  • If China Bubble Bursts, Will Global Economy Notice? Monday, 5 Feb 2007 | 12:31 PM ET

    We’ve been telling you of the huge run-up in the Chinese stock market lately. It has had some froth let out in the past weeks, but the bubble still seems like it could burst for good any time now. Reporting for CNBC, Cheng Lei looked at the day-to-day trading environment in China.

  • Dell Returns and Greenspan's "Briefcase" Award Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 | 8:22 AM ET
    Dell

    Stocks in the U.S. for now, look ready to run at the opening bell, continuing yesterday's Fed triggered rally. Some fresh data, pending home sales, auto sales, and some big earnings, including oil companies, are the headlines investors will watch today. Chinese stocks stabilized overnight, and Japanese shares rose.

  • The Big Fear: "Irrational Exuberance" In China Wednesday, 31 Jan 2007 | 2:17 PM ET

    China is experiencing a bull market unlike anything seen since the dot-com glory days of the late 1990’s in the U.S. But there could be a big "uh-oh" moment coming. Analysts, journalists, regulators, even the ruling Communist party, are beginning to take notice that the recent run-up in the Chinese stock market...

  • Fed Speak And "Irrational Behavior" For China Investors Wednesday, 31 Jan 2007 | 8:14 AM ET
    Henry Paulson, Treasury Secretary

    Stocks in the U.S. are pointing lower this morning. The Fed's statement, important economic data and earnings could all drive the markets today. President Bush speaks on the economy on Wall Street and Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson appears before Senate Banking on the Chinese currency issue.

  • China's Economy Grows at Fastest Pace in 11 Years Wednesday, 24 Jan 2007 | 10:53 PM ET

    China's economy grew 10.7% in 2006, the fastest rate since 1995, as investment and exports powered ahead despite a raft of government curbs to keep the pace of expansion in check.

  • Bartiromo In Davos: Coke CEO "Drinks In" Global Growth Wednesday, 24 Jan 2007 | 4:26 PM ET

    Coca-Cola  may be the best known and widely sold commercial brand in the world. So when the company CEO speaks--a lot of people listen. CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo conducted a rare interview with Coke CEO E. Neville Isdell at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Bartiromo asked Isdell a range of questions ranging from how he plans to combat rising soda prices to how he plans to further grow the company on a global level.

  • Global Slide For Tech And GE's Plastic "Sell Off" Friday, 19 Jan 2007 | 8:28 AM ET

    Stocks in the U.S. look set for a weaker opening, influenced by touchy tech stocks, earnings, and the big decline in oil. Dow components GE and Citigroup both reported earnings early today. GE's 12 percent increase was in line with expectations and Citigroup's lower profits were a bit better than Wall Street expected. Citigroup also raised its dividend by 10 percent.

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