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  • The current weakness of the US dollar may make it look like a casualty of the crisis, but "this interpretation would be premature," Commerzbank foreign exchange strategist Lutz Karpowitz wrote in a research note.

  • Charts Predict: Gold Heading To $1,200 Friday, 18 Sep 2009 | 4:52 AM ET

    The recent rally in the price of gold will continue and push on to new all-time highs around $1,200 per troy ounce, David Sneddon, technical analyst at Credit Suisse, told CNBC.

  • Recovery May Be Sharper than Most Expect: Mussa Thursday, 17 Sep 2009 | 12:46 PM ET

    The economic recovery may be sharper than many forecasters, including the International Monetary Fund, have predicted, precisely because the recession was so deep, Michael Mussa, senior fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, told CNBC.com.

  • Market Tips: S&P May Hit 1,250 by March Thursday, 17 Sep 2009 | 7:28 AM ET

    As US stocks continue to push higher, some investors are increasingly concerned that the market is becoming over-extended. But one analyst told CNBC that he expects the S&P 500 to tack on nearly 200 points by March.

  • Banks Hold Seed of Next Economic Crisis: Magnus Wednesday, 16 Sep 2009 | 8:58 AM ET
    The Crisis: 1 Year Later - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Banks are now too big for their own good, as a result of the economic crisis, and actually contain the seeds of the next economic crisis, George Magnus, UBS senior economic adviser, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • 'Drunken Binge of Excess' Is Over: Stephen Roach Wednesday, 16 Sep 2009 | 8:27 AM ET

    Western economies have woken up with a hangover from a drunken binge of excess consumption and leverage that was reckless and irresponsible, Stephen Roach, chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia, told CNBC.

  • Market Tips: Double Dip May Be Coming Next Year Wednesday, 16 Sep 2009 | 5:35 AM ET

    As the global economy struggles to shake off the worst effects of the recession and return to growth, some analysts think that there is a real risk of the second leg lower.

  • Toxic Assets May Get a Value Soon: Richard Lefrak Tuesday, 15 Sep 2009 | 9:43 AM ET
    This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    The toxic assets dilemma may be solved in the next few weeks, when results from an auction in securities backed by residential mortgages are made public by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), commercial real estate investor Richard Lefrak told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Market Tips: Dollar Outlook is Grim Tuesday, 15 Sep 2009 | 5:05 AM ET

    In the wake of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the U.S. dollar saw widespread declines as the Federal Reserve was forced to slash interest rates to eventually zero. Since then there has been growing speculation that the greenback may not hold on to its status as the world’s reserve currency and faces more declines. 

  • Sarkozy Wants Happiness Used as Economic Indicator Monday, 14 Sep 2009 | 11:21 AM ET

    France plans to include happiness and well-being in its measurements of economic progress, French President Nicolas Sarkozy said Monday, beckoning other countries to join in a "revolution" in the way growth is tracked after the global economic crisis.

  • Treasurys Are the Next Bubble: Rogers Monday, 14 Sep 2009 | 7:30 AM ET

    The bulging US government debt can turn into an investment opportunity, legendary investor Jim Rogers, chairman of Rogers Holdings, told CNBC Monday.

  • US Debt Clock

    The worst of the economic crisis is not over and a currency crisis can happen this year or the next year, because the problem of too much debt in the system has not been solved, legendary investor Jim Rogers told CNBC Monday.

  • European Union Forecasts End to Recession Monday, 14 Sep 2009 | 6:26 AM ET
    Flags of member states of the European Union.

    The European Union said Monday that the recession in the euro-zone and EU will likely have ended in the third quarter with the resumption of modest economic growth.

  • 10 More Banks Should Have Failed: Jim Rogers Monday, 14 Sep 2009 | 6:24 AM ET
    Jim Rogers

    The Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department should have let 10 banks fail, not just Lehman Brothers, for the financial system to clean itself up, legendary investor Jim Rogers told CNBC Monday.

  • Abolish the Federal Reserve and let AIG go bankrupt for the world economy to emerge cleaner from the financial meltdown, legendary investor Jim Rogers told CNBC a year ago.  A year after Lehman Brothers collapsed, here is what Jim Rogers tells CNBC:

  • Charts: Gold at $1,000 is Meaningless Thursday, 10 Sep 2009 | 6:23 AM ET

    Investors’ growing fascination with the gold price pushing above $1,000 per troy ounce is not backed up by the charts and investors should wait until it breaks above the real resistance level of $1,034 before piling in, Clive Lambert, director at FuturesTechs, told CNBC.

  • Global Crisis Is 'Really Good' for China: Goldman Wednesday, 9 Sep 2009 | 6:55 AM ET

    China will continue to grow as the crisis has forced it to shift from an export-led economy to one which bases its development on domestic consumption, Jim O'Neill, head of global economic research at Goldman Sachs, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The Dollar Doesn't Face a Free-Fall Risk: Doll Wednesday, 9 Sep 2009 | 6:46 AM ET

    The dollar will continue to drift but it doesn't face the risk of a free-fall, while healthcare stocks will rebound once the dispute over healthcare reform is settled, Robert Doll, BlackRock vice-chairman, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Charts: S&P 'Starting to Roll Over'; to Test 981  Wednesday, 9 Sep 2009 | 5:02 AM ET

    The rally in the S&P 500 is starting to lose momentum and the index could “attack the downside” toward 981 points in the coming weeks, Chris Locke, MD at Oystertrade.com Management, told CNBC.

  • Global Recovery Might Be Earlier: IMF Head Tuesday, 8 Sep 2009 | 6:15 AM ET

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