GO
Loading...

Barack Obama

More

  • Want a sign of how much big, costlier and more ambitious the Democratic caucus efforts is this year compared to four years ago? Consider these two facts: Four years ago, eventual winner John Kerry entered caucus night with 300 drivers prepared to haul supporters to caucus sites. This year, says former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, Hillary Clinton's campaign has 5,000 of them.

  • Iowa Votes: Three Key Points You Should Keep In Mind Thursday, 3 Jan 2008 | 1:55 PM ET
    Iowa map

    Here are three things to watch for when Iowans vote tonight: 1) Mobilization: if Democratic turnout is huge, that's a sign that Barack Obama has succeeded in pulling out enough independent voters to win. It would also show the energy and enthusiasm that Democrats hope will give them an edge in the general election.

  • Iowa Countdown: Songs, Jokes And The Redskins Wednesday, 2 Jan 2008 | 2:54 PM ET

    Snapshots from the closing hours of the Iowa caucus: Song choices: At John Edwards rallies, Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising." At Barack Obama's, Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed and Delivered." At Hillary Clinton's, Dolly Parton's "9 to 5." At Mike Huckabee's rally in Des Moines last night, it was "Sweet Home Alabama" --except the candidate himself was on stage strumming guitar with a local band.

  • Warren Buffett will be appearing live three times on CNBC and CNBC.com Tuesday in connection with the fund-raiser he's hosting in San Francisco for Hillary Clinton's presidential bid.   The first live interview on CNBC is scheduled for 10:15a ET, with a joint Buffett-Clinton interview planned for late in the afternoon.  The fund-raiser itself will be streamed live on CNBC.com

  • In a live interview this afternoon on CNBC with Hillary Clinton standing by his side, Warren Buffett again warned that the U.S. could fall into recession, if unemployment increases significantly.  But he said he's not sure that will happen and he's been surprised that the employment market has held up as well as it has so far.

  • Washington "Scuffles" Providing Political "Shuffles" Monday, 10 Dec 2007 | 12:14 PM ET

    I can't help noticing the dramatic difference between the political and government parts of my beat these days--complete gridlock in Washington and turbulent action on the 2008 campaign trail. In the capital, Democrats and Republicans are fighting over literally everything--the budget, energy legislation, a fix for the out of control Alternative Minimum Tax.

  • New Presidential Polls Show Race Is Far From Over Thursday, 29 Nov 2007 | 2:45 PM ET
    Barack Obama

    A fresh round of polls has underscored the sense of flux in the 2008 presidential race--in both parties. A Washington Post-ABC News poll of Iowa Democrats shows a three-way race for the Jan 3 caucuses--but with Barack Obama, not Hillary Clinton, in the lead.

  • Presidential Candidates Still Depend On TV Ads Thursday, 29 Nov 2007 | 2:44 PM ET

    Before the campaign is done, the TV ads will run the full range from nutty to nasty and tens of millions of Americans will battleground states will see them. But for now, candidate commercials are largely confined to Iowa and New Hampshire television screens. And they are having an impact.

  • Campaign 2008: What To Watch For In The "Negative" Tuesday, 27 Nov 2007 | 1:42 PM ET

    It's getting hot out there on the presidential 2008 trail as voting time draws closer. Here are a few things to remember as you watch the rhetorical and advertising bullets fly: 1. There's NOTHING wrong with drawing contrasts with an opponent--aka "going negative"--if there's a solid basis for it.

  • Hillary Clinton performed strongly at last night's Democratic debate in Nevada. She needed too, after a difficult two weeks in which she harmed her own cause and Barack Obama found his stride. But that doesn't mean that the "Clinton is champ" storyline is any more certain now than the "Obama is surging" was last week.

  • Hillary, Rudy Facing Toughest Times Of All? Wednesday, 14 Nov 2007 | 5:41 PM ET

    Those of who follow political campaigns often can't discern turning points until the campaigns are over. The 2008 contest may be no different. But just now there's a sense of ferment in both parties' presidential contests--and it's happening awfully close to the Jan 3 kickoff of the nomination process in Iowa.

  • Democrats enter the 2008 presidential race with powerful political advantages. But they face a tough and unpredictable battle because of the vulnerabilities of front-runner Hillary Clinton. A new Wall Street Journal-NBC poll shows that Americans have turned sharply away from President Bush and toward domestic issues favoring his partisan adversaries

  • Barack Obama: "I support Hollywood Writer's Strike" Monday, 5 Nov 2007 | 5:13 PM ET

    Here's the video of my report today about Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama coming out in support of the Hollywood writer's strike. Take a listen.

  • Democrats

    There are a couple ways to tell that we’ve hit the critical competitive phase of the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination fight. One is the way that all major campaigns are now spending a large chunk of the millions they’ve raised on television ads in Iowa. The state’s Jan. 3 caucuses have traditionally turned on contest may once have turned overwhelmingly on organizational prowess.

  • The Tom Brokaw piece on NBC Nightly News Monday night highlighting Warren Buffett's call for a higher tax rate on very wealthy Americans includes an excerpt from a sit-down interview with Buffett. We're now able to bring you Brokaw's complete interview with Buffett, only on CNBC.com.

  • Dems Debate: Did Hillary Open Door For Opponents? Wednesday, 31 Oct 2007 | 9:30 AM ET
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    What made last night's Democratic debate on MSNBC so significant was not, as advertised ahead of time, that Barack Obama and John Edwards attacked Hillary Clinton. It was that Clinton herself unintentionally affirmed their attacks with her own words.

  • Barack Obama

    Barack Obama has signaled that he's finally ready to step up his challenge to Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton. From his point of view, it's not a minute too soon. Thus far, Obama has been largely passive--an electric and charismatic presence on the stump, to be sure, but a candidate surprisingly loath to take the fight to a rival with formidable advantages.

  • Political Ads: Lots Of Spending But Who Benefits? Wednesday, 3 Oct 2007 | 9:16 AM ET

    The numbers are in and it was a rich third quarter for candidates--Hillary Clinton's campaign raised $27 million in the third quarter, beating Barack Obama, whose campaign raised about $20 million over the same time period.

  • GOP/Dems: Is Presidential Hopeful List Shrinking? Wednesday, 3 Oct 2007 | 9:13 AM ET
    Newt Gingrich

    The decision by Newt Gingrich to bypass the 2008 presidential race means the fields in both parties are set--at least for now. I wasn't surprised by Gingrich's decision; since talking with him at a press breakfast a couple of weeks ago, I didn't expect his exploratory effort to result in a "Go", though I did expect it to last longer than just a few days.

  • Clinton/Obama At Dems Debate: Missed Opportunities Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 10:36 AM ET

    The single signature moment of last night's debate was what first appeared to be Hillary Clinton's declaration of independence from her ex-president husband. "He's not the one standing here"--her line after Tim Russert pressed on differences between her position and Bill Clinton's on torture--was a dramatic and effective moment of self-assertion.