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Homeland Security

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  • Osama bin Laden

    Computers taken from Osama Bin Laden's Pakistan compound could reveal a motherlode of information on Al Qaeda donors and has probably already dealt a serious blow to Al Qaeda fund raising, according to a Middle East law expert.

  • Osama Who? Tuesday, 3 May 2011 | 12:58 PM ET
    Saudi-born alleged terror mastermind Osama bin Laden is seen in this video footage recorded at an undisclosed location in Afghanistan aired by the Qatar-based satelite TV station al-Jazeera in 2001.

    Turns out a lot of people using Twitter Sunday night asked "Who is Osama Bin Laden?" as the site went nuts with news of his death. Really? Even if you've been living under a rock (or cave in Tora Bora) or without internet service (like, in a compound in Abottabad), you know who "OBL" is, right? Not so.

  • Osama's Death Leads To Rise In Flag Sales Tuesday, 3 May 2011 | 12:04 PM ET

    The orders started coming in just minutes after President Obama formally announced the death on Sunday night. People wanted their flags.

  • Eyes on the Ball     Tuesday, 3 May 2011 | 8:20 AM ET

    Former Home Security chief Michael Chertoff, The Chertoff Group, discusses the next steps in the fight against terrorism, and why the US needs to stay in Afghanistan and re-examine its relationship with the government of Pakistan. With Lawrence Bossidy, former Honeywell chairman & CEO.

  • Twitter and Osama — The Flip Side Monday, 2 May 2011 | 12:57 PM ET
    Saudi-born alleged terror mastermind Osama bin Laden is seen in this video footage recorded at an undisclosed location in Afghanistan aired by the Qatar-based satelite TV station al-Jazeera in 2001.

    You'll hear a lot this week about Twitter's news value. However, I'm blogging about its flip side. If Twitter has changed the flow of information to us, it has also changed the flow of information from us. Never before have people had such a platform to react.

  • Busch: Bin Laden — What’s Next Is What Count Monday, 2 May 2011 | 12:29 PM ET

    Last night, President Obama went on air to announce the killing of the United States enemy number one, Osama Bin Laden.  Given this volatile and uncertain world we inhabit, how should we view this event? In the short run when it comes to terrorism, the best news is usually no news meaning no attacks.

  • Global Risk in Response to Bin Laden     Monday, 2 May 2011 | 11:48 AM ET

    CNBC's Hampton Pearson takes a look at the major concern over airport security, across the nation and CNBC's Brian Sullivan says debt is still a major concern among other global risks.

  • A Personal Recollection     Monday, 2 May 2011 | 11:39 AM ET

    Sharing his loss and his personal views on Osama bin Laden's death, with John Duffy, KBW chairman/CEO.

  • Are We Safer Now?     Monday, 2 May 2011 | 11:31 AM ET

    The question remains as to whether we are safer now than we were yesterday. Insight with Rich Miniter, "Mastermind: The Many Faces of 9-11 Architect" author and Michael Balboni, former Obama Homeland Security advisor.

  • Secretary Clinton on Bin Laden Death     Monday, 2 May 2011 | 9:33 AM ET

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton discusses the nation's efforts to capture or kill Osama Bin Laden and warns the Taliban they should choose to participate in a peaceful political process.

  • Divided Libya Looks 'Increasingly Likely' Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 4:17 AM ET
    A Libyan jet bomber crashes after being shot down in Benghazi on March 19, 2011 as Libya's rebel stronghold came under attack, with at least two air strikes and sustained shelling of the city's south sending thick smoke into the sky.

    As anti-aircraft fire rang out across Tripoli for the third night in a row and US airstrikes yet to slow, one analyst told CNBC that there is a very real chance of Libya being divided between the Gaddafi-controlled West and rebel-controlled East.

  • Suspicious Bank Letter Was Greeting Card: NYPD Wednesday, 19 Jan 2011 | 12:53 PM ET

    New York City police say a suspicious letter sent to a midtown Manhattan bank turned out to be a greeting card from a headhunting firm.

  • Christmas Week Starts Off With Lump of Coal Monday, 20 Dec 2010 | 12:11 PM ET

    It's only Monday, and I'm thinking of calling in sick the rest of the week. Here are just a few of the headlines which greeted me this morning.

  • Trading Our WikiLeaks-Led Future Thursday, 16 Dec 2010 | 7:13 PM ET

    Here are the two best plays right now on cyber security.

  • At a Checkpoint, Terror Fears and Testy Travelers Tuesday, 23 Nov 2010 | 10:37 AM ET
    TSA Xray machines airport

    Behind an unmarked door, in a cluttered break room of half-eaten lunches and morale-boosting posters, a dozen Transportation Security Administration officers listened to their airport supervisor deliver another much-needed pep talk that contained the reminder: “I get paid to be paranoid, and so do you.” The New York Times reports.

  • Megan McArdle Bids Farewell to Airlines Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 4:15 PM ET

    The TSA full body scanners are the last straw. She's breaking up with air travel.

  • TSA Outrage — The Marketing Opportunity Thursday, 18 Nov 2010 | 12:33 PM ET
    A TSA officer demonstrates what the images form the Advanced Imaging Technology unit look like.

    I need to stop shaking my head over this whole TSA thing and start making some money. Others are way ahead of me.

  • In Defense of Airport Security Wednesday, 17 Nov 2010 | 10:53 AM ET
    A TSA officer demonstrates what the images form the Advanced Imaging Technology unit look like.

    New scanners allow TSA officers to basically see you naked, and there are concerns about radiation. Critics allege this is the worst kind of funny business.

  • Officials Defend Intimate Airport Security Methods Monday, 15 Nov 2010 | 8:46 AM ET

    Officials are defending new anti-terrorism security procedures at the nation's airports that some travelers complain are overly invasive and intimate.

  • White House Weighs Response to Mail Bomb Plot Monday, 1 Nov 2010 | 8:35 AM ET

    Teams of U.S. anti-terrorism and security experts are headed to Yemen to help search for suspects in the mail bomb plot and to train cargo screeners at the San'a airport.