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  • Pros Say: We're Only 2/3 Done Finding Bank Skeletons Wednesday, 21 Jan 2009 | 8:26 AM ET

    Global stocks were down again Wednesday on continued signs of trouble in the financial sector. Experts tell CNBC that there is more bad news to come.

  • Pros Say: Don't Bet on Inauguration Rally Tuesday, 20 Jan 2009 | 4:21 AM ET

    Barack Obama will become the 44th President of the United States on Tuesday. Ahead of Obama's inauguration, global stocks were mixed on investors' concerns about the economic difficulties confronting the incoming president. Experts on CNBC expect the dollar and U.S. stock market to fall on Obama's induction.

  • Stocks End Crazy Week on Up Note Friday, 16 Jan 2009 | 6:20 PM ET

    Stocks ended a dismal week on an up note as investors took some defensive positions in stocks like McDonald's amid nagging worries about the health of banks.

  • Stocks Advance as Investors Play Defense Friday, 16 Jan 2009 | 2:44 PM ET

    Stocks were back up in a yo-yo session as investors took some defensive positions in stocks like McDonald's amid nagging worries about the health of banks.

  • Futures Rally on Bailout Optimism Friday, 16 Jan 2009 | 8:14 AM ET

    Futures rallied on the back of the Bank of America bailout Friday, with investors hoping the government will do all in its power to save big institutions from collapsing.

  • Pros Say: The 4 Huge Financials Dangers of '09 Friday, 16 Jan 2009 | 4:47 AM ET

    Global stocks were up Thursday after the U.S. said it would support Bank of America's purchase of Merrill Lynch with a $20 billion investment by the government and a promise to protect against losses on bad loans, removing a risk for investors. Experts highlight four perils that will dominate 2009.

  • Stocks Finish Up as Tech Offsets Banks Thursday, 15 Jan 2009 | 4:05 PM ET

    Major indexes declined Thursday as investors digested the latest round of earnings and layoff news.  Bank of America skidded amid news that the bank is going back to the government  for help, while JPMorgan ticked higher after beating earnings estimates.

  • Pros Say: Euro Zone Rates Likely to Bottom at 0.5% Thursday, 15 Jan 2009 | 9:42 AM ET

    The European Central Bank is widely expected to cut interest rates by 50 basis points Thursday, to a record low of 2 percent. But how low will the central bank go? Experts tell CNBC euro-zone rates could bottom at 0.5 percent.

  • Futures Pare Losses; JPMorgan Climbs Thursday, 15 Jan 2009 | 8:43 AM ET

    Stock futures pared their losses after a round of economic data came in more or less as expected. Bank of America skidded amid news that the bank is going back to the government  for help, while JPMorgan ticked higher after beating earnings estimates.

  • Column: How Low Should Euro Rates Go? Wednesday, 14 Jan 2009 | 8:28 AM ET

    The European Central Bank remains stuck to staff projections that the euro zone economy will shrink by just 0.5 percent this year while inflation slows to 1.4 percent and warns of a low-interest rate trap.

  • Pros Say: Rate Cuts Have No Impact Wednesday, 14 Jan 2009 | 5:42 AM ET

    A day ahead of the European Central Bank's rate decision, more dismal data showed the euro zone needs monetary easing. But experts tell CNBC that central banks' interest-rate cuts have little impact on the economy in the current financial turmoil.

  • Pros Say: German Stimulus 'Irrelevant' Tuesday, 13 Jan 2009 | 5:53 AM ET

    The euro remained under pressure Tuesday despite the German government approving a second stimulus package worth $64 billion to help Europe's largest economy.

  • Bonds Show It's 'Ferociously Dangerous': Hendry Monday, 12 Jan 2009 | 5:33 AM ET

    Government bonds are still the safest bet for investors in these uncertain times, and the euro will face an uphill battle as weak economies will need more flexibility, Hugh Hendry, Chief Investment Officer and Partner at Eclectica, told CNBC.

  • China's Economy May Contract: Hendry Monday, 12 Jan 2009 | 5:18 AM ET

    There is a big chance that the Chinese economy will contract, as exports are falling because of the financial crisis that has gripped Western economies, Hugh Hendry, chief investment officer and partner at hedge fund Eclectica, told CNBC.

  • Pros Say: Short Euro-Yen This Week Monday, 12 Jan 2009 | 4:03 AM ET

    The euro fell against the dollar and the yen Monday ahead of the European Central Bank's interest-rate decision on Thursday. Experts tell CNBC that the single euro-zone currency will experience headwinds this year.

  • Sarkozy, Merkel, Blair Call for New Capitalism Thursday, 8 Jan 2009 | 9:34 AM ET

    The head of Europe's biggest economy said Thursday that world leaders should be looking at the massive U.S. deficit and other economic imbalances, not just problems caused by financial markets, as they debate a new global order.

  • US Could Lose 1 Million Jobs this Month: ING Wednesday, 7 Jan 2009 | 6:44 AM ET

    New Year optimism is likely to be shaken by shocking numbers in the monthly employment report, with a loss of one million jobs coming "sooner than you might think," ING Bank analyst Rob Carnell wrote in a research note.

  • Pros Say for 2009: Banks Will Start Lending Tuesday, 30 Dec 2008 | 2:46 AM ET

    For most investors, the best thing about 2009 is that it isn't 2008, as one analyst pointed out. CNBC experts share their predictions for the year to come as the world goes through the worst recession in generations.

  • Charts Predict: The Best Currency for 2009 Wednesday, 24 Dec 2008 | 5:19 AM ET

    The Swiss franc is likely to shine over the next two years as other currencies are set to weaken, Christopher Locke, technical analyst at Oystertrade.com Management told CNBC.

  • Find Value in First Half 'Disaster': Dr. Doom Tuesday, 23 Dec 2008 | 5:08 AM ET
    bull and bear outside frankfurt stock exchange

    The first half of next year will be very bad for the world economy, but investors will find value in stock markets as some deeply discounted shares will stage a rebound, Marc Faber, editor and publisher Gloom, Boom and Doom Report, told CNBC.