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Tokyo Court Says Samsung Infringed on Apple 'Bounce-Back' Patent

Friday, 21 Jun 2013 | 7:30 AM ET
Samsung Galaxy S smartphone
Getty Images
Samsung Galaxy S smartphone

A Tokyo court ruled on Friday that Samsung Electronics had infringed on rival Apple's patent for a "bounce-back" feature on earlier models of its popular smartphones.

Samsung and Apple, the world's top two smartphone makers, are fighting patent disputes in 10 countries as they compete to dominate the lucrative mobile market and win customers with their latest gadgets.

Apple claimed that Samsung had copied the "bounce-back," in which icons on its smartphones and tablets quiver back when users scroll to the end of an electronic document. Samsung has already changed its interface on recent models to show a blue line at the end of documents.

(Read More: Apple iPhones, iPads Infringed on Samsung Patent)

Has Samsung Cornered Apple With Latest Win?
CNBC's Jon Fortt reports the details on the battle between the two tech titans over a patent infringement suit.

The Japanese court's decision comes after the U.S. Patent and Trademark office judged in April that Apple's patent for the bounce-back feature was invalid, allowing older Samsung models that had a similar feature to remain on sale.

The Tokyo court is scheduled to release more details on the ruling at 0730 GMT.

(Read More: With Latest Ban, Has Samsung Cornered Apple?)

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  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Cadie Thompson is a tech reporter for the Enterprise Team for CNBC.com.

  • Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

  • Mark is CNBC's Silicon Valley/San Francisco Bureau Chief covering technology and digital media.