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Commentary: Why Musk should build the Hyperloop

Hyperloop passenger transport capsule conceptual design sketch.
Source: Elon Musk
Hyperloop passenger transport capsule conceptual design sketch.

It's not just wishful thinking to want Elon Musk to build at least a prototype of his proposed Hyperloop. In my opinion, it's really the only logical way we'll see if his vision for high speed mass transportation can become a reality.

Yes, I know. Half of you reading this think Musk is nuts and I'm equally messed up for believing his Hyperloop system might work.

I also realize many who dig the idea of the Hyperloop are ignoring all the reasons why it may fail to work exactly as Musk envisions for the low cost he predicts.

(Read more: Cramer: "Why I'm betting on Musk")

Fair enough. But my gut says the billionaire inventor and entrepreneur will build a prototype Hyperloop and here are four reasons why:

1) He's already considering a prototype

Before unveiling the Hyperloop Alpha proposal, Musk said he was too busy with Tesla, Space X and his other ventures to think about building the "loop".

But during a reporter conference call after he revealed the idea, Musk said, "I think it might help if I created a prototype and sort of helped get things going."

2) Musk loves a technical challenge

He's an inventor and inventors love the idea of creating something new and revolutionary.

(Read more: Musk unveils plans for $10 billion Hyperloop transportation system)

I suspect when Musk hears people scoff at his idea as just a theory about improving long distance travel, he'll feel the urge to at least show the world it's possible.

"I'm not trying to make a ton of money on this," says Musk, "But I would like to see it come to fruition."

3) Hyperloop has been percolating for more than a year.

He may have pulled an all-nighter putting together the Hyperloop proposal, but this idea has been swirling in his head the last year and half. In that time it's gone from a singular idea to a concept that eventually included the input of a dozen engineers from Tesla and Space X.

It's clearly gained momentum in Musk's mind.

And he admits, the Hyperloop proposal is still evolving.

"I wouldn't say that our design has specifically changed because of feedback we've seen, but I'm sure it will," he says.

(Read more: Sci-fi Hyperloop-type technology under development at ET3)

4) If he doesn't do it, nobody will.

As much as Musk talks about someone else stepping up, taking his Hyperloop idea and running with it, the reality is he's the only one (outside of a university or govt. agency) who can make it happen.

Sure other business men or private companies have the deep pockets building even a prototype would require.

But Musk brings the X factor to the possibility of the Hyperloop. He's not afraid to take a chance. If it were to fail, I don't think he'd consider the time and money spent to be a waste.

(Read more: Musk: Autopilot Cars, Hyperloops and Cheaper Tesla)

So what if Musk eventually does step up and build a Hyperloop prototype and it works as he and his engineers have said it would?

Potentially, it could change travel between cities like San Francisco and L.A, Chicago and St. Louis or Dallas and Houston.

Musk knows this, and that could be enough to drive him to build a prototype of the Hyperloop.

—By CNBC's Phil LeBeau. Follow him on Twitter @LeBeauCarNews.

Questions? Comments? BehindTheWheel@cnbc.com.

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